Inferno

Inferno

Web site: www.vitanuova.com/inferno/
Origin: UK
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GUI
Architecture: x86, ARM, PA-RISC, MIPS, PowerPC, SPARC
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Inferno
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4 | March 28, 2015

Inferno – an operating system designed for building distributed and networked systems on a wide variety of devices and platforms. Inferno was based on the experience gained with Plan 9 from Bell Labs, and currently being developed by Vita Nuova. Applications for this system are written in the Limbo language. The name of the system and some related programs (including Styx, Limbo) come from the Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Inferno can run as a user application on top of an existing operating system or as a stand alone operating system. Most of the popular operating systems and processor architectures are supported:
– Host Operating Systems
– Windows NT/2000/XP
– Irix
– Linux
– MacOS X
– FreeBSD
– Solaris
– Plan 9

Inferno applications are written in Limbo®, a modern, safe, modular, concurrent programming language with C-like syntax. It is more powerful than C but considerably easier to understand and debug than C++ or Java. It is easy to express the concurrency in the physical world directly in Limbo’s syntax. Any Inferno application will run identically on all Inferno platforms.

High level security is an important part of the Inferno system. By using one standard protocol for all network communication, security can be focused on one point and provided at a system level. Inferno offers full support for authenticated, encrypted connections using a certificate based user identification scheme and variety of algorithms.

Inferno 4 was released in 2005 as free software.

Founded in March 2000, Vita Nuova Holdings Ltd is an operating systems and application development company specializing in technologies for distributed applications on network devices and embedded systems.

Download

Inferno 20150328 Unix-like systems (FreeBSD, Linux, MacOS X, Plan 9) 71MB.tgz
md5sum: 1b3b406dcaa9d7919e933dd192d53a39

Inferno Windows 2000, XP, and 7 62MB.zip
md5sum: 728b515bc6d866a24bed9b573965ee90

Inferno Mac OSX 386 3,7MB.tgz
md5sum: 83a10dc646f421dead3d59d63bc64ba8

Inferno source code
md5sum:

 

Amoeba

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Web site: www.cs.vu.nl/pub/amoeba/
Origin: Netherlands
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86, MIPS, Motorola 68030, NS 32016, SUN 3/50 & 3/60, SPARC, VAX
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Amoeba_(operating_system)
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 5.3 | July 30, 1996

Amoeba – a fully functional operating system with shared time by Andrew S. Tannenbaum from Vrije University. The Amoeba distribution includes the source code, binaries and kernels for all supported architectures plus full on-line and Postscript versions of the documentation.

Amoeba is a powerful microkernel-based system that turns a collection of workstations or single-board computers into a transparent distributed system. It has been in use in academia, industry, and government for about 5 years. It runs on the SPARC (Sun4c and Sun4m), the 386/486, 68030, and Sun 3/50 and Sun 3/60.

Amoeba is a general-purpose distributed operating system. It is designed to take a collection of machines and make them act together as a single integrated system. In general, users are not aware of the number and location of the processors that run their commands, nor of the number and location of the file servers that store their files. To the casual user, an Amoeba system looks like a single old-fashioned time-sharing system.

Amoeba is an ongoing research project. It should be thought of as a platform for doing research and development in distributed and parallel systems, languages, protocols and applications. Although it provides some UNIX emulation, and has a definite UNIX-like flavor (including over 100 UNIX-like utilities), it is NOT a plug-compatible replacement for UNIX. It should be of interest to educators and researchers who want the source code of a distributed operating system to inspect and tinker with, as well as to those who need a base to run distributed and parallel applications. Amoeba is intended for both ‘‘distributed’’ computing (multiple independent users working on different projects) and ‘‘parallel’’ computing (e.g., one user using 50 CPUs to play chess in parallel). Amoeba provides the necessary mechanism for doing both distributed and parallel applications, but the policy is entirely determined by user-level programs. For example, both a traditional (i.e. sequential) ‘make’ and a new parallel ‘amake’ are supplied.

 

Oberon

Oberon

Web site: www.ethoberon.ethz.ch
Origin: Switzerland
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: TUI (text user interface)
Architecture: x86, Ceres, Xilinx Spartan, SPARC, PowerPC, RIOS, MIPS
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Oberon
Media: Install
The last version | Released: V5 | 2013 (?)

Oberon – a single-user, multi-tasking system that runs on bare hardware or on top of a host operating system. Oberon is also the name of a programming language in the Pascal/Modula tradition.

The Oberon project was started at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (ETHZ) in 1985 by Niklaus Wirth and Jürg Gutknecht. Although the project was originally targeted towards in-house hardware, the language and system have now been ported to many computer platforms. Oberon is also a name of a modern integrated software environment.

In 1991, Jürg Gutknecht and his group continued the development towards the ETH Oberon System. The goal was to exploit the inherent potential and features of Oberon to a much larger degree, upgrade the system by a concept of composable and persistent objects, complement the textual user interface by a graphical companion and provide support for the ubiquitous network. In 1995, the first official Oberon System 3 release was finished. Since then, the system has been constantly improved and extended. In 1997, the Release 2.2 including a large palette of applications was published together with a comprehensive hypertext-based documentation. In March 2000, a new release was ready and the system was renamed “ETH Oberon System”.

The original Oberon system is a single-threaded, single-user, co-operative multi-tasking operating system that runs on bare hardware or on top of a hosted operating system as a single-window application. The ETH Oberon System is an extended version that has intrinsic support for persistent objects and for building graphical user interfaces. It presents itself as a hierarchy of modules, many of which export one or several powerful abstract data types. Application modules simply reuse these data types and do not have to care about their implementation at all.

ETH Oberon System highlights:
– Advanced Textual User Interface
– Integrated object support in the kernel
– Object Autonomy and Persistence
– Extensibility by Software Bus Technology
– Fully Hierarchical Composability
– Generalized MVC Scheme
– Powerful GUI Framework Gadgets
– Self-Contained Documents
– Extensibility on Different Levels

The ETH Oberon System package includes several interesting tools and applications. Many of them were developed as productivity tools by ETH assistants and students.

The Oberon system is available free of charge and no registration is required for downloading the material. The source code is available under a BSD-like License.

The source of the Oberon screenshot is Wikipedia; uploader: SomPost; under BSDU License.

 

Plan 9

Plan 9

Web site: http://plan9.bell-labs.com/plan9/
Origin: USA
Category: Specialist
Desktop environment: Rio
Architecture: x86, x86_64, MIPS, DEC Alpha, SPARC, PowerPC, ARM
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Plan 9
Media: Live CD/USB
The last version | Released: 4 | 2002
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: Plan 9

Plan 9 – a distributed operating system, originally developed by the Computing Sciences Research Center at Bell Labs between the mid-1980s and 2002. Its original designers and authors were Ken Thompson, Rob Pike, Dave Presotto, and Phil Winterbottom.

Plan 9 demonstrates a new and often cleaner way to solve most systems problems. The system as a whole is likely to feel tantalizingly familiar to Unix users but at the same time quite foreign.

Plan 9 is an operating system kernel but also a collection of accompanying software. The bulk of the software is predominantly new, written for Plan 9 rather than ported from Unix or other systems. The window system, compilers, file server, and network services are all freshly written for Plan 9. Although classic Unix programs like dc, ed, and troff have been brought along, they are often in an updated form.

Starting with the release of Fourth edition on April 2002, the full source code of Plan 9 from Bell Labs was freely available under Lucent Public License 1.02.

There is an open source fork of Plan 9 called 9front (or Plan9front) being still under active development.

Download

Plan 9 4 90MB.iso.zip
md5sum: e5be8ff34c216b9193059c399031ceb5
Plan 9 4 USB Image 89MB.zip
md5sum: 0d365922b98828afd3e23cfcb82f28d8