AnNyung

AnNyung

Web site: annyung.oops.org
Origin: South Korea
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Fedora
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.3 R5 | August 20, 2009

AnNyung – a former Linux distribution from South Korea based on Fedora. The distribution was delivered with its own technology for security.

As of version 2.0, AnNyung exists only as an addition to CentOS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, not as a complete installation.

The project supports 32-bit i686 computer architecture.

The first version 1.0 was launched on April 24, 2003.

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AnNyung 1.3 i686 271MB.iso
md5sum: 8b95e4baf2780ac2c9989b5bf88f5a05
AnNyung 1.3-R5 i686 276MB.iso
md5sum: 2a3126eee451e1fac5e5f6b332a38b0d

 

Caldera

Caldera OpenLinux

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: LST Power Linux
Wikipedia: Caldera OpenLinux
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 3.1.1 | June 1, 2002

Caldera OpenLinux – a based on LST Power Linux, a Slackware-derived distribution that had been maintained by Linux Support Team since 1993 and the first to come with a Linux 2.0 kernel. It was developed by Caldera Systems (now SCO Group) since 1998.

Caldera Systems created a full featured GUI system administration tool called Caldera Open Administration System (COAS). The tool was a unified, easy to use administration tool with a modular design. With its scalability and broad scope abilities.

Source: wikipedia.org; License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License;

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Caldera OpenLinux 3.1 Workstation i386 661MB.iso
md5sum: 9435023bc5fae5086dbb6505fabcd1dd
Caldera OpenLinux 3.1 Server i386 637MB.iso
md5sum: 25fee2586812ccf5bc5dd02cfef8012b

 

PC-BSD

PC-BSD

Web site: pcbsd.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: Lumina
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia: TrueOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 10.3 | April 4, 2016
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: TrueOS

PC-BSD – an open-source operating system based on FreeBSD and fully compatible with it. PC-BSD is easy to use and targeted to home and office users.

It has an easy-to-use graphical installer, the default environment is KDE, but the installer (since version 9.0) also offers GNOME, LXDE and Xfce desktops. From 2014, the project developed own, Qt based with Fluxbox window manager, desktop environment called Lumina.

PC-BSD uses the “.pbi” packages. The package manager allows you to install packages with dependencies as well.
Unlike FreeBSD and Linux, the “.pbi” packages contain all the libraries needed to run the program, so the manager installs each one separately.
The advantage of this policy is ease of installing packages, the disadvantage of their large size.

PC-BSD was offered in form of hybrid DVD/USB installation media.

In August 2016, PC-BSD changed its name to TrueOS and is a rolling release operating system.

The project founder is Kris Moore.

Download

PC-BSD 10.0 Install amd64 3.66GB.iso
md5sum: 6ba4d8ae90f943d76ed02b6de29612f9

PC-BSD 9.0 Live KDE/GNOME/XFCE/LXDE x86 2.10GB.iso
md5sum: b3a6957c2bda29d046143e20cb31454d

 

PmBSD

null

Web site: pmbsd.org (not active)
Origin: France
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | 2012

PmBSD (Pigeon Mouette BSD) – a project provides a FREE, multi-platform BSD UNIX-like operating system.

PmBSD is ‘what we think a BSD is’ and was totally written from scratch. The only sources stolen by this project were stolen from OpenBSD and are a part of this website and the file sys/queue.h.

The project founder is Sylvestre Gallon.
It was under active development between 2009 and 2012.

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FabBSD

null

Web site: fabbsd.org
Origin: Canada
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: 4.4BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | May 2018

FabBSD – a special purpose 4.4BSD-based UNIX-like operating system, designed for machine control applications. Using low-cost hardware, FabBSD can be used to control a wide array of CNC milling machines, lathes, routers, process-control and automation equipment.

A common task of FabBSD systems is the coordinated motion of machine axes, whether driven by steppers, servo-motors or cylinders (with or without software-based closed-loop control). FabBSD uses a kernel-mode trajectory planner to generate stable motion control signals (using blended S-curve velocity profiles) at high frequencies with minimal hardware requirements.

It features applications such as:
– Machine tools: CNC milling machines, lathes, routers, lasers
– Automation: Manipulators, power supplies, relays, valves, heaters
– Instrumentation: Optical encoders, thickness gauges, sensors

FabBSD’s kernel and base are forked from OpenBSD. Its machine control drivers (/sys/dev/cnc/), userland libraries (libcnc) and applications could be easily ported back to OpenBSD, NetBSD or FreeBSD with minimal patching to other parts of the kernel. The base distribution includes OpenSSH, Sudo, Binutils, GCC and GDB. The installation process is straightforward (via CD-ROM, FTP, floppies or tapes).

As of 2018, FabBSD is undergoing active development again and contributors are welcome to provide feedback or patches.

The project founder is Julien Nadeau Carriere.

 

Voltalinux

Web site: voltalinux.sicurezzarete.com
Origin: Italy
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.2 beta | March 11, 2009

Voltalinux – a GNU/Linux distribution based on Slackware Linux and the pkgsrc package system from NetBSD. The pkgsrc package manager is available to the Linux users.

The distribution is mainly intended for server use but you can be used as a desktop OS too.

Some key features of “Voltalinux”:
· Slackware 100% compatible
· no need to compile anything to have a working system
· many prebuilt kernels
· more than 5400 ports ready to be used.

Requirements:
· i486 processor or newer
· 32 MB of RAM memory
· about 400 MB of free disk space

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DEMOS

DEMOS on WIndows

Web site: (not active)
Origin: Russia (Soviet Union)
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Motorola 68020, PDP-11, CM 1700, XT Clones
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: DEMOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 3.0 ? | May 1983 ?

DEMOS / Демос (Dialogovaya Edinaya Mobilnaya Operatsionnaya Sistema / Диалоговая Единая Мобильная Операционная Система) – a Soviet version of Unix that included portions of AT&T Unix, portions from BSD, and some parts translated into Russian, and other utilities written in Russian.

The system development been started by Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in 1982, and later development was doing with cooperation of DEMOS Co-operative.

It was developed for:
– SM-4 (a PDP-11/40 clone)
– SM-1600

It was ported to:
– Elektronika-1082
– BESM
– ES EVM
– clones of VAX-11(SM-1700)
– PC/XT
– Elektronika-85 (a clone of DEC Professional)
– Motorola 68020-based microcomputers

The project been closed in 1991.

The screenshot source: gunkies.org; author: Neozeed; license: GNU Free Documentation License 1.2.

 

BeakOS

BeakOS

Web site: beakos.com.mx (not active)
Origin: Mexico
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, Xfce
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia (ES): BeakOS GNU/Linux
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 1.7 | October 1, 2011

BeakOS – a built from scratch Linux distribution designed to limited hardware and very robust high-performance computers, provides desktop and server editions. The desktop editions are available with GNOME desktop environments and XFCE/FluxBox as well.

Beakos focused on productive environment because it manages resources and client/server architecture applications that it integrates, however its developers also made an effort to provide a desktop system with applications that the most common users demand. Beakos was development driven by Infotec (Information and Documentation Fund for Industry), which is part of the Conacyt centers.

The screenshot’s author: Francisco Sosa Romero; source: Wikipedia; License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported.

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SunOS

null

Web site: oracle.com/us/sun/index.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: 386i, Sun, SPARC
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: SusOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.1.4 | November 1994

SunOS – a UNIX based OS derived from BSD, created by Sun Microsystems. Initially released in 1982, it was the standard OS on Sun Machines at that time. Platforms supported by this OS were the Motorola 68000, the Sun 386i, and the SPARC.

Sun-1’s were the very first models ever produced by Sun. The earliest ran Unisoft V7 UNIX; SunOS 1.x was introduced later. According to some sources, fewer than 200 Sun-1’s were ever produced; they are certainly rare. The switch from Motorola 68000’s to 68010’s occurred during the Sun-1’s reign. Some models are reported to have 3Mbit Ethernet taps as well as 10Mbit.
68000-based Sun-1’s are not supported by SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-1’s may be the same as the last version to support Sun-2’s, since the 100U CPU boards are the same part.

Sun-2’s were introduced in the early 1980’s and were Sun’s first major commercial success. While not as popular or as common as the later Sun-3’s, they did well and there are still quite a few in circulation in the home/collector-used market.
All Sun-2’s are based on the Motorola 68010 and run SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-2’s was 4.0.3. Early Sun-2’s were Multibus; later models were VME, which Sun continued to use through the Sun-3 era and well into the Sun-4 line.

Sun switched to using the Motorola 68020 with the introduction of the Sun-3’s. A few later models had 68030’s, but by that time Sun was already moving toward SPARC processors. All models either have a 68881 or 68882 FPU installed stock or at least have a socket for one. All models which are not in pizza box chassis are VMEbus. Two out of three pizza box models have a “P4” connector which can take a framebuffer; the exception is the 3/50.
Support for Sun-3’s was introduced in SunOS 3.0. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-3’s was 4.1.1U1.
During the Sun-3 era, Sun introduced the handy practice of putting the model number on the Sun badge on the front of the chassis.
There are two different kernel architectures in the Sun-3 model line. All 68020-based models are “sun3” architecture; 68030-based models (the 3/80 and 3/4xx) are “sun3x” architecture.

The Sun 386i models, based on the Intel 80386 processor, were introduced when 80386-based IBM PC/AT clones were starting to become widespread. Intel had finally produced a chip sufficiently capable (32-bit, among other things) to allow porting SunOS, and using an Intel processor and an ISA bus offered the ability to run MS-DOS applications without speed-draining emulation. Unfortunately, they were a dismal failure.
Support for Sun-386i’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0. The 386i SunOS releases came from Sun’s East Coast division, so 386i SunOS was not identical to the standard version with the same number. The last released version of SunOS to support Sun-386i’s was 4.0.2; there are a few copies of 4.0.3Beta (with OpenLook 2.0) floating around.

Support for Sun-4’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0, although there was a special variant of SunOS 3.2 for Sun-4’s which was shipped with some very early units. Since this product line is still current, it is still in general supported by SunOS, which has mutated to become part of Solaris. Support for some earlier models has been dropped, and some later models require at least 4.0.3c, 4.1.1, or Solaris 2.x.

SunOS took a shift starting with version 5.0, which changed its base from BSD to Unix System V Release 4, and became Solaris. The last release under the SunOS name was Version 4.1.4, released in November 1994.

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GNOSIS

null

Web site: cis.upenn.edu/~KeyKOS/Gnosis/Gnosis.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: IBM ?
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: GNOSIS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | ?

GNOSIS (Great New Operating System In the Sky) – an example of a completely different kind of operating system. Gnosis was developed by TYMSHARE as a proprietary control program and it also developed proprietary application packages to run on it. GNOSIS was based on the research of Norman Hardy, Dale E. Jordan, Bill Frantz, Charlie Landau, Jay Jonekait, et al. McDonnell Douglas bought Tymshare, Inc. and then sold it in 1984 to Key Logic.

Programs under Gnosis are built out of protection domains with firewalls between them. Domains are small, simple, and cheap.
Domains communicate through doors in the firewalls, called capabilities. Capabilities are a simple, uniform, efficient means of representing authority.

There are several significant factors which make it possible.

* First, and foremost, the Gnosis concept of distinct domains without implicit interactions between them results in simpler programs. Because of this, we have had to spend a great deal of time designing the interfaces between these domains to insure that adequate function exists in each; but perhaps even that is a benefit since we will know exactly how the system goes together. The basic design of Gnosis will ensure that no compromises to the design occur during the implementation.

* Second, because individual components are completely isolated from each other, except for the prescribed interfaces, it is a simple matter to implement each domain independently of the remainder of the operating system. Very little scaffolding is required. We went to install the CMS editor in Gnosis and noted all of the things we thought ought to be there as co-requisites, things like a command language to call the editor, a file system, a loader, catalog facilities, and so on. To our surprise, we discovered that we didn’t need any of those facilities. We could just connect the editor directly to the terminal handler and test it. This made development go much quicker.

* Third, we have been able to coexist with, and take advantage of, CMS during the early going. We expect to use CMS services for quite some while for compiling programs and so forth. Thus our “critical mass” of code is very much smaller that it would otherwise be.

* Fourth, the basic design of Gnosis allows us to write most of the operating system as user code, which means we will be able to eliminate a lot of duplication of effort in terms of testing tools, etc. The system will also be much simpler because all of the details of the hardware are masked in the kernel. Consequently no domain programmer need ever deal with them, which makes the domains simpler, and also greatly reduces the impact of any hardware changes. We have tended to follow the advice of Fred Brooks in the Mythical Man-month, where he suggests “be prepared to throw the first one away.” We have implemented each domain with the simplest possible algorithms in order to test the design. Later we will have to discard many of these domains and rewrite them with high performance algorithms which obey the same interface specifications. Most of these first attempt domains can be implemented In a matter of days.

* Last, but certainly not least, we have a relatively high technology “office of the future” system called AUGMENT which we are using to keep all of our design notes as well as our user documentation. The use of this system,will save us a significant amount of labor as we develop a user community over the next several years.

The combination of these facilities has made it possible for us to implement a great deal of function very quickly. As Norm mentioned earlier, we have only just started running our first domains recently. Yet we expect to be able to have a significant online database application operational within a year.

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