SunOS

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Web site: oracle.com/us/sun/index.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: 386i, Sun, SPARC
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: SusOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.1.4 | November 1994

SunOS – a UNIX based OS derived from BSD, created by Sun Microsystems. Initially released in 1982, it was the standard OS on Sun Machines at that time. Platforms supported by this OS were the Motorola 68000, the Sun 386i, and the SPARC.

Sun-1’s were the very first models ever produced by Sun. The earliest ran Unisoft V7 UNIX; SunOS 1.x was introduced later. According to some sources, fewer than 200 Sun-1’s were ever produced; they are certainly rare. The switch from Motorola 68000’s to 68010’s occurred during the Sun-1’s reign. Some models are reported to have 3Mbit Ethernet taps as well as 10Mbit.
68000-based Sun-1’s are not supported by SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-1’s may be the same as the last version to support Sun-2’s, since the 100U CPU boards are the same part.

Sun-2’s were introduced in the early 1980’s and were Sun’s first major commercial success. While not as popular or as common as the later Sun-3’s, they did well and there are still quite a few in circulation in the home/collector-used market.
All Sun-2’s are based on the Motorola 68010 and run SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-2’s was 4.0.3. Early Sun-2’s were Multibus; later models were VME, which Sun continued to use through the Sun-3 era and well into the Sun-4 line.

Sun switched to using the Motorola 68020 with the introduction of the Sun-3’s. A few later models had 68030’s, but by that time Sun was already moving toward SPARC processors. All models either have a 68881 or 68882 FPU installed stock or at least have a socket for one. All models which are not in pizza box chassis are VMEbus. Two out of three pizza box models have a “P4” connector which can take a framebuffer; the exception is the 3/50.
Support for Sun-3’s was introduced in SunOS 3.0. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-3’s was 4.1.1U1.
During the Sun-3 era, Sun introduced the handy practice of putting the model number on the Sun badge on the front of the chassis.
There are two different kernel architectures in the Sun-3 model line. All 68020-based models are “sun3” architecture; 68030-based models (the 3/80 and 3/4xx) are “sun3x” architecture.

The Sun 386i models, based on the Intel 80386 processor, were introduced when 80386-based IBM PC/AT clones were starting to become widespread. Intel had finally produced a chip sufficiently capable (32-bit, among other things) to allow porting SunOS, and using an Intel processor and an ISA bus offered the ability to run MS-DOS applications without speed-draining emulation. Unfortunately, they were a dismal failure.
Support for Sun-386i’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0. The 386i SunOS releases came from Sun’s East Coast division, so 386i SunOS was not identical to the standard version with the same number. The last released version of SunOS to support Sun-386i’s was 4.0.2; there are a few copies of 4.0.3Beta (with OpenLook 2.0) floating around.

Support for Sun-4’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0, although there was a special variant of SunOS 3.2 for Sun-4’s which was shipped with some very early units. Since this product line is still current, it is still in general supported by SunOS, which has mutated to become part of Solaris. Support for some earlier models has been dropped, and some later models require at least 4.0.3c, 4.1.1, or Solaris 2.x.

SunOS took a shift starting with version 5.0, which changed its base from BSD to Unix System V Release 4, and became Solaris. The last release under the SunOS name was Version 4.1.4, released in November 1994.

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GNOSIS

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Web site: cis.upenn.edu/~KeyKOS/Gnosis/Gnosis.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: IBM ?
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: GNOSIS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | ?

GNOSIS (Great New Operating System In the Sky) – an example of a completely different kind of operating system. Gnosis was developed by TYMSHARE as a proprietary control program and it also developed proprietary application packages to run on it. GNOSIS was based on the research of Norman Hardy, Dale E. Jordan, Bill Frantz, Charlie Landau, Jay Jonekait, et al. McDonnell Douglas bought Tymshare, Inc. and then sold it in 1984 to Key Logic.

Programs under Gnosis are built out of protection domains with firewalls between them. Domains are small, simple, and cheap.
Domains communicate through doors in the firewalls, called capabilities. Capabilities are a simple, uniform, efficient means of representing authority.

There are several significant factors which make it possible.

* First, and foremost, the Gnosis concept of distinct domains without implicit interactions between them results in simpler programs. Because of this, we have had to spend a great deal of time designing the interfaces between these domains to insure that adequate function exists in each; but perhaps even that is a benefit since we will know exactly how the system goes together. The basic design of Gnosis will ensure that no compromises to the design occur during the implementation.

* Second, because individual components are completely isolated from each other, except for the prescribed interfaces, it is a simple matter to implement each domain independently of the remainder of the operating system. Very little scaffolding is required. We went to install the CMS editor in Gnosis and noted all of the things we thought ought to be there as co-requisites, things like a command language to call the editor, a file system, a loader, catalog facilities, and so on. To our surprise, we discovered that we didn’t need any of those facilities. We could just connect the editor directly to the terminal handler and test it. This made development go much quicker.

* Third, we have been able to coexist with, and take advantage of, CMS during the early going. We expect to use CMS services for quite some while for compiling programs and so forth. Thus our “critical mass” of code is very much smaller that it would otherwise be.

* Fourth, the basic design of Gnosis allows us to write most of the operating system as user code, which means we will be able to eliminate a lot of duplication of effort in terms of testing tools, etc. The system will also be much simpler because all of the details of the hardware are masked in the kernel. Consequently no domain programmer need ever deal with them, which makes the domains simpler, and also greatly reduces the impact of any hardware changes. We have tended to follow the advice of Fred Brooks in the Mythical Man-month, where he suggests “be prepared to throw the first one away.” We have implemented each domain with the simplest possible algorithms in order to test the design. Later we will have to discard many of these domains and rewrite them with high performance algorithms which obey the same interface specifications. Most of these first attempt domains can be implemented In a matter of days.

* Last, but certainly not least, we have a relatively high technology “office of the future” system called AUGMENT which we are using to keep all of our design notes as well as our user documentation. The use of this system,will save us a significant amount of labor as we develop a user community over the next several years.

The combination of these facilities has made it possible for us to implement a great deal of function very quickly. As Norm mentioned earlier, we have only just started running our first domains recently. Yet we expect to be able to have a significant online database application operational within a year.

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HPBSD

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Web site: flux.utah.edu/~mike/hpbsd/hpbsd.html
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: HP 9000
Based on: 4.3BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.0 | April 1993

HPBSD – a port of 4.3BSD UNIX operating system for the HP9000 300, 400, 700 and 800 series machines done by Systems Programming Group at the University of Utah, developed between 1987 and 1993.

The goal was to replace the HP-UX (System V derivative) with BSD environments on HP machines in Utah CS department, in order to improve compatibility with Vaxen who worked on BSD and Sun workstations that ran on SunOS. Port was completed in a month, thanks to an older BSD port for HP 9000/200. Trait that was HPBSD tell any binary compatibility with HP-UX-TV. I went to support the HP 9000 HPBSD was later inserted into the main tree BSD code, and appeared in 4.3BSD-Reno.

The current version, HPBSD 2.0, is still largely based on 4.3bsd but has the 4.4bsd filesystem and networking kernel code and utilities as well as the ANSI-compliant C library. This version was “released” in April 1993. Improvements has been limited to bug fixes and support for new hp700 CPUs that we have. It is still the desktop operating system of choice inside the Flux and Avalanche research groups.

HPBSD is based on the 4.3 release of BSD from CSRG at Berkeley with additions from 4.4bsd and numerous local modifications. It still looks and feels pretty much like a 4.3 system, but configuring and building software packages is more 4.4bsd-like.

Supported Hardware: HP300/400 (68k based) and HP700/800 (PA-RISC based).
Since HPBSD contains AT&T and HP proprietary code it is not freely available.

The project founder is Mike Hibler.

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2.11BSD

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Web site: github.com/RetroBSD/2.11BSD
Origin: ?
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: 4.3BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.11 | November 1994

2.11BSD – a BSD operating system based on and comes with several missing pieces that came after the 4.3BSD-Tahoe. 2.11BSD CSRG was the last edition of the DEC PDP-11 line system. This release is maintained Steven Schultz with a series patchlevel. It is the release of 4.4BSD-Lite, and requires the original UNIX license.

The system hasn’t been fit onto a non-separate I&D or machine without a floating point processor in a long time. Lots of overlay schemes need to be worked out; the floating point simulator in the kernel hasn’t been tested; sendmail won’t run on a non-separate machine, so bin/mail and ucb/Mail have to auto-configure not to use sendmail; csh is overlaid now even on a separate I&D machine, /lib/cpp is pushing the limit to handle all the #define’ing that is required to compile the kernel.

Due to the amount of software ported from 4.3BSD (and the Internet) he number of PORT directories has been cut down in order to fit the distribution on two 1600bpi tapes. Many of the sources not included are available from INTERNET archive sites, others will have to be acquired from a friendly 4.3BSD site.

Credits: Cyrus Rahman, of Duke University; Steven Schultz, of Contel Federal Systems; Keith Bostic; Casey Leedom.

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2.11BSD-pl195 i386 27MB.tar
md5sum: fae5078f664069a383013325d290960a

 

386BSD

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  • Web site: 386bsd.org
  • Origin: USA
  • Category: Server
  • Desktop environment: CLI
  • Architecture: x86
  • Based on: UNIX
  • Wikipedia: 386BSD
  • Media: Install
  • The last version | Released: 2.0 | August 2016

386BSD – a derived from 4.3BSD, the first open source Berkeley UNIX operating system. It was the progenitor of Linux, iOS, and Android. Beginning with “A Modest Proposal” in 1989, 386BSD broke from proprietary systems by having publicly accessible code and documentation.

386BSD Release 0.0 was distributed in 1993 in tandem to the popular “Porting Unix to the 386” article series published in Dr. Dobb’s Journal.
Release 0.1 quickly followed, enhanced with contributions throughout the globe.

386BSD Release 1.0, aka Jolix, was a break from earlier Berkeley UNIX systems through use of a modular architecture. 386BSD Release 2.0 built upon the modular framework to create self-healing components. Each release introduced novel mechanisms from role-based security to polymorphic protocols.

386BSD.org provides the opportunity to interact with the original source, articles and supporting materials, and a live demo of 386BSD Release 2.0.

386BSD is a mother of free BSD systems today, such as: BSD/386, NetBSD, FreeBSD, BSD/OS, Darwin, OpenBSD and others.

The project authors are Lynne and William Jolitz.

 

Firefly BSD

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Web site: www.fireflybsd.com (not active)
Origin: USA ?
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: DragonFly BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 1.4 ? | September 14, 2004 ?

Firefly BSD – a commercially-supported operating system based on industry DragonFlyBSD a fork of FreeBSD. It comes with complete source and binaries for the kernel, compiler, libraries, and user utilities. In addition, thousands of contributed programs have been ported to Firefly BSD and are included in the 4-CDROM set.

A LiveCD that you can boot and run off without having to install anything on your hard drive.
A parallelized networking stack that allows for better use of multiprocessors than the serialized approach taken in FreeBSD 5.
It offers a choice of KDE 3 or Gnome 2 graphical environments on top of XFree86-4.4.0.
Ability to run Microsoft Windows network drivers to support an even wider range of network devices.

The project developer is David Rhodus.

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Caos Linux

Caos Linux

Web site: www.caoslinux.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, Xfce
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: CAOS Linux
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 1.0.25 | October 14, 2009

Caos Linux – an independent, RPM based Linux distribution developed by the CAOS Foundation. The CAOS Linux Project was first initated because of the need for an openly managed, RPM based version of Linux. CAOS NSA (Node, Server, Appliance) pursues the “sweet spot” concept for a Linux distribution.

CAOS Linux is designed to run on all x86_64 and i386 based hardware ranging from clusters and servers to production level appliances to personal desktops and laptops. Scientific research labs, public agencies, ISP’s, private enterprise, virtualization and cloud computing ventures will find CAOS Linux to be an integral component to their operation.

CAOS NSA focuses on being a lightweight, fast, efficient, stable, and secure distribution of Linux that is appropriate for servers, compute nodes, network appliances, and even the latest desktop and laptop computers.

Supporting a wide variety of software, CAOS Linux is based on the best aspects of GNU/Linux and has full binary compatibility with the most popular enterprise distribution of Linux.

The CAOS Linux installer would be found easy to use by both an experienced admin or a Linux newcomer. Users can either have a fully automated install (including HD partitioning) or they can take full control from the install prompt. The automated CAOS Linux installer, Cinch, is a very user friendly, written from scratch and open to use by other distributions. Your CAOS system has the advantage of grabbing the latest packages from our online repository during installation, guaranteeing your system is up to date. Post-installation configuration is simple through either Sidekick, our server administration Swiss Army Knife, manually, or via the web using an industry compatible webmin tool.

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Caos Linux 1.0 x86_64 2.37GB.iso
md5sum: 15f68fa01cd74c788c11df771c4d218a

 

Lineox

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Web site: www.lineox.net
Origin: Finland
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: Red Hat
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.096 | August 13, 2006

Lineox (Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux) – a series of versions of Lineox Enterprise Linux 4.0 which contain all the available bug and security fixes for Lineox Enterprise Linux 4.0 on the installation disks.

This saves both download and installation time. Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux is available for download as four CD-ROM images and a DVD-ROM image. The high speed download quota for one disk type version costs 10 € and 15 € for both versions. Lineox expects to release a new version of Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux once or twice a week.

Currently Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux 4.x is available for x86 and x86_64 architectures, but we may add more architectures later.

The distribution was under active development between 2003 and 2006; closed down in 2009.

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Scientific Linux

Scientific

Web site: www.scientificlinux.org
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop, Server, Science
Desktop environment: GNOME, IceWM, KDE
Architecture: x86_64
Based on: Red Hat
Wikipedia: Scientific
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 7.7 | August 14, 2019
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: Scientific

Scientific – a Linux distribution built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and addressed to scientific institutions. The development of the operating system since 2004 is managed by the European Center for Nuclear Research CERN (Switzerland) and the American Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). From version 7.x, the main sponsor and coordinator of the project is Fermilab.

System images are available as installation and live media for the i386 and x86_64 hardware architecture. Live versions are equipped with KDE, GNOME and IceWM desktops.

Goals:
– Provide a stable, scalable, and extensible operating system for scientific computing
– Support scientific research by providing methods and procedures for enabling the integration of scientific applications with the operating environment
– Use the free exchange of ideas, designs, and implementations to prepare a computing platform for the next generation of scientific computing

As James Amundson, the Head of Scientific Computing Division announced (April 22, 2019), the Scientific Linux will be discontinued.

Download

Scientific 7.7 Everything x86_64 9.8GB.iso
md5sum:

Scientific 7.6 LiveDVD GNOME x86_64 1.84GB.iso
md5sum: 1080668e6d0b9a7d018a3233e78ce5cf
Scientific 7.6 LiveDVD KDE x86_64 1.95GB.iso
md5sum: 8a57f4d8c2fe9a188bb7085a9f454b37
Scientific 7.6 Netinst x86_64 562MB.iso
md5sum: 8e2c3ba76877b876195ff6e884304045

 

BZERK

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Web site: www.bzerk.org
Origin: ?
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 1.0.2 | May 2003 ?

BZERK CD – a complete installation of the -current development branch of FreeBSD. No installation required, all you need is a PC with CDRom drive you can boot from and you have a working Unix system. It contains plenty of new features, making it a valuable tool for system rescue administrators.

BZERK CD does not provide a graphical user interface (GUI), it works from a command line only.

It has a lot of new features, making it a valuable rescue tool for system administrators, for example:
– Automatic network detection
– Splash welcome screen
– Netbackup Client
– Tools for Linux filesystems ext2 and ext3

BZERK is making some supplementary customized software and configuration files, making the Bzerk CD useable as a cheap and safe production server, for example:
– ADSL Firewall/router
– Mailserver or MailHUB
– DNS server
– Webserver

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