Genera

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Web site: symbolics-dks.com
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: arm64, DEC Alpha, Apple M1,x86_64
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Genera_(operating_system)
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.0 Portable | 2021

Genera – a proprietary, commercial operating system and integrated development environment for Lisp machines created in 1982 by Symbolics. It is a fork of an operating system created on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) AI Lab’s Lisp machines which Symbolics had used in common with Lisp Machines, Inc. (LMI), and Texas Instruments (TI).

Symbolics is currently a privately held company which acquired the assets and intellectual property of the old public company called Symbolics, Inc. The old Symbolics was the premier producer of special-purpose computer systems for running and developing state-of-the-art object-oriented programs in Lisp. It designed and built workstations as well as writing a fully object-oriented operating system and development environment called “Genera” to run on those workstations. Symbolics also created a number of software tools to work with Genera. The new Symbolics continues to sell and maintain these products, along with Open Genera which runs on Alpha processor based workstations running Tru64 Unix. If you would like to know why you should be interested in developing your application in Genera, click here to see 25 reasons. Symbolics also distributes the Macsyma and PDEase software products for Windows PCs.

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Genera Core-i5 649KB
md5sum: 57c72642a9ce10422e5dc58535caeff4
Genera Core-i7 485KB
md5sum: f9ee7c8cc2648b36ffb144a22599d7d8
Genera 8.5 Xlib Patched amd64 53MB.vlod
md5sum: 95995142e0032ea53121fa2d6f267511

HeliOS

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Web site: (not active)
Origin: United Kingdom
Category: workstation
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Transputer
Based on: UNIX-like
Wikipedia: HeliOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.3.1

HeliOS – an open-source, Unix-like operating system for parallel computers developed by Perihelion Software. Helios was developed by the (now defunct) company called Perihelion Ltd., mainly targeting the INMOS Transputer but later adding other CPUs like the ARM series or TMS320c4x DSPs when INMOS’ decline became clear.

Perihelion Software Limited was a United Kingdom company founded in 1986 by Dr. Tim King along with a number of colleagues who had all worked together at MetaComCo on AmigaOS and written compilers for both the Amiga and the Atari ST.

The HeliOS primary architecture is the Transputer. The transputer is a series of pioneering microprocessors from the 1980s, featuring integrated memory and serial communication links, intended for parallel computing.

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Domain/OS

Apollo Computer

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: wgmr
Platform: Apollo
Based on: UNIX-like
Wikipedia: Domain/OS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: R10.4.1.2 | March 1992

Domain/OS – an Unix-like and Multics*-like the Apollo/DOMAIN operating system produced by Apollo Computer, Inc. (founded in 1980 in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, by William Poduska) from 1980 until 1989, when it was purchased by Hewlett-Packard. It was originally launched in 1981 as AEGIS, and was rebranded to Domain/OS in 1988.

The first Apollo/DOMAIN systems were the DN100s, of which 2 were shipped on March 27, 1981 with Aegis SR1 installed on them to Harvard University (information provided by Jim Ward). Documentation for Aegis SR1 consisted of 3 books written by Penny Orwick. The DN100s were discarded by Harvard University a few years ago (Harvard CS Help Desk).

The latest OS that is available for Apollo’s is Domain/OS SR10.4.1.2 (SAU7) and SR10.4.1.1 (all other SAUs), consisting of 5 tapes for SR10.4 and 3 tapes for the SR10.4.1 upgrade. Hewlett-Packard offers some patches for Apollo/DOMAIN machines (You are now required to register (free) to retrieve any patches) (Domain/OS SR10.3.5 and SR10.4/SR10.4.1). Those patches bring the OS up to SR10.4.1.2. All the SAUs from SAU1 thru SAU6 (all three-digit machines except the new HP/Apollo 4xx Series) were dropped at SR10.4 and thus can’t run Domain/OS SR10.4 operating system. SAU1 (DN100, DN400, DN420, DN600) was dropped at about SR9.7.5 or SR9.7, thus making SAU1 systems (DN100, DN400, DN420, DN600) the only ones that can’t run any of the SR10 systems.

The DN10000 machines run a different OS release, with a .p suffix, which stands for PRISM, the name of the DN10000 CPU’s architecture (Parallel Reduced Instruction Set Machine), e.g. SR10.4.p. The latest OS for DN10000’s is SR10.4.1.2.p, consisting of the 5 basic install tapes for SR10.4.p, one upgrade tape for SR10.4.1.p and HP’s patches.

Apollo was one of the first vendors of graphical workstations in the 1980s, featuring a display manager which was integrated with the operating system’s own window manager known as wmgr.

*Multics (“Multiplexed Information and Computing Service”) is an influential early time-sharing operating system based on the concept of a single-level memory.

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Sprite

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Web site: ftp.cs.berkeley.edu/ucb/sprite/sprite.html
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: DECstation, SPARCstation 2
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: Sprite
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1992

Sprite – a research operating system developed at the University of California, Berkeley, by John Ousterhout’s research group.

Sprite is a distributed operating system that provides a single system image to a cluster of workstations. It provides very high file system performance through client and server caching. It has process migration to take advantage of idle machines. It was used as a testbed for research in log-structured file systems, striped file systems, crash recovery, and RAID file systems, among other things.

The Sprite project has now ended, although Sprite is still running on a few machines. If you have a DECstation 5000/200 or a SparcStation 2, you could try running Sprite off the Sprite CD-ROM.

The one single archive contains following files:
– bench.tar.Z: Sources for a collection of small benchmarks used in the paper “Why Aren’t Operating Systems Getting Faster as Fast as Hardware”.
– gdb.tar.Z: gdb for Mach 3.0. (missing)
– gld.tar.Z: Gnu linker with modifications for cross-linking between different machine types.
– hash.tar.Z: The Sprite hashing package. You’ll also need the list package.
– list.tar.Z: The Sprite list package.
– mab.tar.Z: Sources for Modified Andrew Benchmark (used in paper “Why Aren’t Operating Systems Getting Faster as Fast as Hardware” and for other purposes).
– mipsim.tar.Z: A simulator and assembly-language program debugger for the MIPS R2000 architecture, written by John Ousterhout for use in a freshman-level course in C and assembler.
– tcl: A subdirectory full of various files containing sources and documentation for Tcl and Tk and related packages. See the README file in that directory for more information.
– xtsim.tar.Z: library to interface event driven simulator to Xt toolkit.
– sprite-1.096.tar.Z: Sprite kernel sources, version 1.096. Won’t compile into a kernel, but useful for browsing or borrowing code.
– sprited.tar.Z: Sources for a Mach-based Sprite single-server. Mostly of interest only to people doing work with Mach.
– cdrom.txt: Information about Sprite sources and docs on CDROM.

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Sprite archive files 8MB.zip
md5sum: 6f67131f55f5069026f1e70b429983c3

LOCUS

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Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: VAX-11
Based on: UNIX compatible
Wikipedia: LOCUS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1983

LOCUS – a UNIX-like distributed operating system developed at UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles, USA) between 1980 and 1983.

LOCUS is a distributed operating system which supports transparent access to data through a network wide filesystem, permits automatic replication of storaget supports transparent distributed process execution, supplies a number of high reliability functions such as nested transactions, and is upward compatible with Unix. Partitioned operation of subnetl and their dynamic merge is also supported.
The system has been operational for about two years at UCLA and extensive experience in its use has been obtained.

LOCUS is a Unix compatible, distributed operating system in operational use at UCLA on a set of 17 Vax/750’s connected by a standard Ethernets. The system supports a very high degree of network transparency, i.e. it makes the network of machines appear to users and programs as a single computer;
machine boundaries are completely hidden during normal operation. Both files and programs can be moved dynamically with no effect on naming or correct operation. Remote resources are accessed in the same manner as local ones. Processes can be created locally and remotely in the same manner, and process interaction is the same, independent of location. Many of these functions operate transparently even across heterogeneous cpus.

LOCUS also provides a number of high reliability facilities, including flexible and automatic replication of storage at a file level, a full implementation of nested transactions[MEUL 83], and a substantially more robust data storage facility than conventional Unix systems. All of the functions reported here have been implemented, and most are in routine use.

An important part of the LOCUS research concerns recovery from failures of parts of the system, including partition of a LOCUS system into separated but functioning subnetworks.

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ForthOS

ForthOS

Web site: sources.vsta.org/forthos/
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: VSTa
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released:

ForthOS – a complete, standalone operating system for the PC. It includes command line, compiler, debugger, editor, and filesystem. You can give it a test drive by booting the standalone CD (image provided so you can burn your own). If you like it, you can install it onto a disk partition and boot directly from your hard disk.

ForthOS was the basis for the author’s own experimental software work; unlike many other Forth systems, this one as a real tool in day-to-day use as a part of a larger development. It is a fully standalone system, with a metacompiler used to generate new versions of ForthOS while running under ForthOS.

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ForthOS v1 448KB.iso.gz
md5sum: a222bb82a80b97a43ee1b324b95d2d34

ForthOS v2 virtual image disk 717KB.img.gz
md5sum: e19198440177084d85353e19e1c01f13

 

FMI/OS

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Web site: fmios.org | fmios.ocgnet.org (not active)
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: VSTa
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released:

FMI/OS (Flexible Microkernel Infrastructure/Operating System) – a copylefted operating system based on the VSTa operating system originally written by Andrew Valencia.

It shares most of the concepts with VSTa but has some new additions such as ELF support, POSIX environment, POSIX error numbers, and the ability to compile with the latest versions of GCC.

The project developer is Erik Dalén.

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No download is available.
md5sum:

 

VSTa

null

Web site: vsta.org
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: VSTa
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.6.8 | October 5, 2004

VSTa (Valencia Simple Tasker) – a copylefted operating system, originally written by Andrew Valencia, which uses ideas from several research operating systems in its implementation. It attempts to be POSIXish except where POSIX gets in the way, and runs on a number of different PC configurations. VSTa is also designed to take advantage of SMP right out of the box.

VSTa is an experimental kernel which attempts to blend the design of a microkernel with the system organization of Plan 9. The result is a small privileged kernel running user-mode tasks to provide system services such as device drivers, filesystems, and name registry. Like Plan 9, each service provides a filesystem-like interface.

While VSTa is not a real-time operating system in itself, numerous features associated with real-time systems offer themselves naturally to solve microkernel design issues. Process memory locking is necessary in order to allow a disk driver task to run as a user process (as otherwise, of course, you will deadlock when your disk driver tries to demand page in a piece of itself from swap.) Non-degrading priorities are necessary to permit critical system services to respond to many users without being penalized for their apparent heavy CPU use. Low-latency process dispatch is necessary to allow interrupt service code to run in a deterministic amount of time after a device event–especially important in the case of heavy data sources like dumb serial ports and LAN interfaces.

VSTa was designed with memory locking and real-time priorities. Except when a spinlock is held, a thread is preemptable even when running in kernel mode. Most spin-locks do not involve interrupt-driven code; for these, interrupts are still accepted and queued even while the spinlock is held–preemption to a real-time process is delayed until the spinlock is released.

VSTa Capabilities are the way by which VSTa defines it’s analagous to POSIX object security. It is a very general system, with a simple design, and high flexibility. A look at how the POSIX system maps into VSTa Capabilities will make it’s operational syntax clear.

The project developer is Andy Valencia.

Download

VSTa 1.6.8 binary files 31.8MB.zip
md5sum: 4ff745bfb92639164dc9cf5b5e1d60a9
VSTa 1.6.8 Boshs/QEMU virtul disk 112MB.img.gz
md5sum: d12652e29b59501e18c85eecf9b62f75
VSTa 1.6.8 source files
md5sum:

 

800 operating systems

The ArchiveOS.org service is online and active over 5 years now, and shares work of many developers of open source and/or freeware distributions/operating systems, to never forget about them.

We already reached a number of 800 operating systems of Linux, BSD, Solaris, DOS and other, independent developed, and we will be added next ones as long as possible.

Most collected operating systems is not active, but there a few still active or reactivated after a time of quiet.

Don’t forget to send a small tip to keep the project alive 🙂

Thank all of you for the last 5 years.
Aneta & Paweł

Digital UNIX

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Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server, Workstation
Desktop environment: CDE
Architecture: Mach
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 5.1 (?) | 2001 (?)

Digital UNIX (previously: OSF/1 or DUNIX) – a 64-bit advanced kernel architecture based on Mach V2.5 kernel design with components from Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) 4.3 and 4.4, UNIX® System V, and other sources. Mach is a kernel developed at Carnegie Mellon University to support operating system research, primarily distributed and parallel computing.

Digital UNIX is DIGITAL Equipment Corporation’s implementation of the Open Software Foundation™ OSF/1 R1.0, R1.1, and R1.2 technology, and the Motif graphical user interface and programming environment.

It supports following file systems: Berkeley UFS, AdVFS, NFS, ISO9660, FAT, SMB, DFS.

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