ForthOS

ForthOS

Web site: sources.vsta.org/forthos/
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: VSTa
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released:

ForthOS – a complete, standalone operating system for the PC. It includes command line, compiler, debugger, editor, and filesystem. You can give it a test drive by booting the standalone CD (image provided so you can burn your own). If you like it, you can install it onto a disk partition and boot directly from your hard disk.

ForthOS was the basis for the author’s own experimental software work; unlike many other Forth systems, this one as a real tool in day-to-day use as a part of a larger development. It is a fully standalone system, with a metacompiler used to generate new versions of ForthOS while running under ForthOS.

Download

ForthOS v1 448KB.iso.gz
md5sum: a222bb82a80b97a43ee1b324b95d2d34

ForthOS v2 virtual image disk 717KB.img.gz
md5sum: e19198440177084d85353e19e1c01f13

 

FMI/OS

null

Web site: fmios.org | fmios.ocgnet.org (not active)
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: VSTa
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released:

FMI/OS (Flexible Microkernel Infrastructure/Operating System) – a copylefted operating system based on the VSTa operating system originally written by Andrew Valencia.

It shares most of the concepts with VSTa but has some new additions such as ELF support, POSIX environment, POSIX error numbers, and the ability to compile with the latest versions of GCC.

The project developer is Erik Dalén.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

VSTa

null

Web site: vsta.org
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: VSTa
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.6.8 | October 5, 2004

VSTa (Valencia Simple Tasker) – a copylefted operating system, originally written by Andrew Valencia, which uses ideas from several research operating systems in its implementation. It attempts to be POSIXish except where POSIX gets in the way, and runs on a number of different PC configurations. VSTa is also designed to take advantage of SMP right out of the box.

VSTa is an experimental kernel which attempts to blend the design of a microkernel with the system organization of Plan 9. The result is a small privileged kernel running user-mode tasks to provide system services such as device drivers, filesystems, and name registry. Like Plan 9, each service provides a filesystem-like interface.

While VSTa is not a real-time operating system in itself, numerous features associated with real-time systems offer themselves naturally to solve microkernel design issues. Process memory locking is necessary in order to allow a disk driver task to run as a user process (as otherwise, of course, you will deadlock when your disk driver tries to demand page in a piece of itself from swap.) Non-degrading priorities are necessary to permit critical system services to respond to many users without being penalized for their apparent heavy CPU use. Low-latency process dispatch is necessary to allow interrupt service code to run in a deterministic amount of time after a device event–especially important in the case of heavy data sources like dumb serial ports and LAN interfaces.

VSTa was designed with memory locking and real-time priorities. Except when a spinlock is held, a thread is preemptable even when running in kernel mode. Most spin-locks do not involve interrupt-driven code; for these, interrupts are still accepted and queued even while the spinlock is held–preemption to a real-time process is delayed until the spinlock is released.

VSTa Capabilities are the way by which VSTa defines it’s analagous to POSIX object security. It is a very general system, with a simple design, and high flexibility. A look at how the POSIX system maps into VSTa Capabilities will make it’s operational syntax clear.

The project developer is Andy Valencia.

Download

VSTa 1.6.8 binary files 31.8MB.zip
md5sum: 4ff745bfb92639164dc9cf5b5e1d60a9
VSTa 1.6.8 Boshs/QEMU virtul disk 112MB.img.gz
md5sum: d12652e29b59501e18c85eecf9b62f75
VSTa 1.6.8 source files
md5sum:

 

800 operating systems

The ArchiveOS.org service is online and active over 5 years now, and shares work of many developers of open source and/or freeware distributions/operating systems, to never forget about them.

We already reached a number of 800 operating systems of Linux, BSD, Solaris, DOS and other, independent developed, and we will be added next ones as long as possible.

Most collected operating systems is not active, but there a few still active or reactivated after a time of quiet.

Don’t forget to send a small tip to keep the project alive 🙂

Thank all of you for the last 5 years.
Aneta & Paweł

Digital UNIX

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server, Workstation
Desktop environment: CDE
Architecture: Mach
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 5.1 (?) | 2001 (?)

Digital UNIX (previously: OSF/1 or DUNIX) – a 64-bit advanced kernel architecture based on Mach V2.5 kernel design with components from Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) 4.3 and 4.4, UNIX® System V, and other sources. Mach is a kernel developed at Carnegie Mellon University to support operating system research, primarily distributed and parallel computing.

Digital UNIX is DIGITAL Equipment Corporation’s implementation of the Open Software Foundation™ OSF/1 R1.0, R1.1, and R1.2 technology, and the Motif graphical user interface and programming environment.

It supports following file systems: Berkeley UFS, AdVFS, NFS, ISO9660, FAT, SMB, DFS.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

AOS

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Web site: uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv/ibm-rt-faq.aos/msg00000.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: RISC 32bit
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media:
The last version | Released: ? | 1987 ?

AOS (Academic Operating System) was IBM’s version of UNIX 4.3BSD for the IBM RT (RISC Technology Personal Computer). Academic institutions were offered as an alternative to AIX, the usual RT operating system. It seems that there was a later version of the AOS that stemmed from 4.3BSD-Reno, but was never distributed in large numbers.

There is also the Academic Operating System from Scratch by Hirochika Asai, the last commit at GitHub was made in 2016.
His project page says:
“We are developing an operating system for my personal research and practical education. For the academic purpose, this motivation is similar to MINIX, but we do not focus on theories. Our main objective is to provide knowledges on hardware-related programming. This is one of the most difficult and complex parts when we start the development of operating system from scratch.”

 

DEMOS

DEMOS on WIndows

Web site: (not active)
Origin: Russia (Soviet Union)
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Motorola 68020, PDP-11, CM 1700, XT Clones
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: DEMOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 3.0 ? | May 1983 ?

DEMOS / Демос (Dialogovaya Edinaya Mobilnaya Operatsionnaya Sistema / Диалоговая Единая Мобильная Операционная Система) – a Soviet version of Unix that included portions of AT&T Unix, portions from BSD, and some parts translated into Russian, and other utilities written in Russian.

The system development been started by Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in 1982, and later development was doing with cooperation of DEMOS Co-operative.

It was developed for:
– SM-4 (a PDP-11/40 clone)
– SM-1600

It was ported to:
– Elektronika-1082
– BESM
– ES EVM
– clones of VAX-11(SM-1700)
– PC/XT
– Elektronika-85 (a clone of DEC Professional)
– Motorola 68020-based microcomputers

The project been closed in 1991.

The screenshot source: gunkies.org; author: Neozeed; license: GNU Free Documentation License 1.2.

 

OpenStep

OpenStep

Web site: gnustep.org/resources/OpenStepSpec/OpenStepSpec.html
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment:
Architecture: IA-32, PA-RISC, SPARC
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: OpenStep
Media: Install
The last version | Released:

OpenStep – an object-oriented operating system that uses any modern operating system as its core. Mainly created by NeXT. NeXT Computer Inc, and Sun Microsystems Inc. teamed up in late 1993 to push a free object layer API based on the NeXTSTEP object system. This agreement evolved into the OpenStep specification which was published by NeXT in a first draft back in summer 1994.

There is a distinction between OpenStep, which is an API specification, and OPENSTEP (capitalized) which is a specific implementation of OpenStep developed by NeXT. Although it was originally created on a Unix-based Mach kernel (just like the NeXTSTEP core), OPENSTEP versions were also available on Solaris and Microsoft Windows NT. Therefore, OPENSTEP libraries (which were supplied with the OPENSTEP system) are actually a subset of the original OpenStep specification.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

NeXTSTEP

NeXTSTEP

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment:
Architecture: Intel x86, Motorola 68000, SPARC, PA-RISC
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: NeXTSTEP
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.2 Pre-release 2 | September 1997

NeXTSTEP – an object-oriented, multitasking operating system created by NeXT Computer, Inc. a company founded in 1985 by Apple Computer co-founder Steve Jobs.

This system was created on the base of Mach microkernel and BSD Unix system code. NeXTStep was oriented to work in a graphical environment. It had a very well-prepared, intuitive user interface, based on object-oriented architecture, quite different from both the most popular then Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Mac OS. The visualization engine was based on Postscript, which on one hand made it very demanding in terms of hardware (considerable demand for memory) and on other hand an ideal solution for industrial and designer workstations.

NeXTSTEP 1.0 was released 18 September 1989 after a couple of hits in 1986, and last Release 3.3 in early 1995, and previously worked only on the Motorola 68000 CPU family (especially the original black boxes) and the generic IBM compatible x86/Intel, Sun SPARC , and HP PA-RISC. About the time 3.2 releases NeXT teamed up with Sun Microsystems to develop OpenStep, cross-platform implementation of the standard (for Sun Solaris, Microsoft Windows, and NeXT Mach kernel version) based on NEXTSTEP 3.2.

In February 1997, after the purchase of NeXT by Apple, it became the source of the popular operating systems macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.

The NeXTSTEP screenshot’s author: Gürkan Sengün; source: Wikipedia; License: GNU GPL.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

386BSD

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  • Web site: 386bsd.org
  • Origin: USA
  • Category: Server
  • Desktop environment: CLI
  • Architecture: x86
  • Based on: UNIX
  • Wikipedia: 386BSD
  • Media: Install
  • The last version | Released: 2.0 | August 2016

386BSD – a derived from 4.3BSD, the first open source Berkeley UNIX operating system. It was the progenitor of Linux, iOS, and Android. Beginning with “A Modest Proposal” in 1989, 386BSD broke from proprietary systems by having publicly accessible code and documentation.

386BSD Release 0.0 was distributed in 1993 in tandem to the popular “Porting Unix to the 386” article series published in Dr. Dobb’s Journal.
Release 0.1 quickly followed, enhanced with contributions throughout the globe.

386BSD Release 1.0, aka Jolix, was a break from earlier Berkeley UNIX systems through use of a modular architecture. 386BSD Release 2.0 built upon the modular framework to create self-healing components. Each release introduced novel mechanisms from role-based security to polymorphic protocols.

386BSD.org provides the opportunity to interact with the original source, articles and supporting materials, and a live demo of 386BSD Release 2.0.

386BSD is a mother of free BSD systems today, such as: BSD/386, NetBSD, FreeBSD, BSD/OS, Darwin, OpenBSD and others.

The project authors are Lynne and William Jolitz.