CompactBSD

null

Web site: compactbsd.sourceforge.net
Origin: ?
Category: Embedded
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.1.0 | August 22, 2002

CompactBSD – a set of tools that allow you to compress OpenBSD onto a small (32MB) compact flash card for use in small embedded servers. CompactBSD can be used to power wireless hot spots, which is what FatPort uses it for.

CompactBSD offers the easiest way to get OpenBSD up and running on Compact Flash-based systems such as the FatPointOEM. In order to use the ZComax 200mW PCMCIA wireless card in your FatPointOEM box, you will need to add a patch to the OpenBSD 3.1 kernel.

CompactBSD runs on an i386-class box running OpenBSD3.1, it also requires that Python 2.1.2 be installed.

The project developer is Ken Simpson.

Download

CompactBSD 0.1.0 i386 348KB.tgz
md5sum: 2b4457d09216c8122385d0dde15df831

 

Biatchux

Biatchux

Web site: biatchux.dmzs.com
Origin: USA
Category: Specialist
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.1.0.6b (?) | March 13, 2002

Biatchux (DMZS-Biatchux Bootable CD) – a bootable CD distribution of which the goal is to provide a freely available immediately deployable platform for performing forensic analysis, incident response, data recovery, host virus scanning and penetration/vulnerability assessment.

This is still in beta but has proven stable for my needs (developers), which prompted it’s creation. I have tried to ensure >2G file handling capability but have not yet tested with any files greater than 2G. I am trusting Dave Dittrich’s advice and his findings toward proper environment setup for >2G.

It should work on AMD, Cyrix and 486’s or greater with 64M memory or greater (as with all things, more seems to be better, or at least more comfy!), and IDE or SCSI boot cd (selected scsi controllers only). Biatchux has now tested successfully on systems with only 64M Ram.

The project developer are William Salusky and David Zendzian.

Download

Biatchux 0.1.0.6b i386 60MB.iso
md5sum: 6e0802dac501923e4d920614e1c52e8b

 

Virtual Linux

Virtual Linux

Web site: www.virtual-linux.org (not active)
Origin: Sweden
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: Mandrake Linux
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.1 Beta | May 3, 2002

Virtual Linux – a derived from the Mandrake Linux operating system, modified to run directly from your cd rom drive.

With Virtual-Linux 1.1 you get about 1.6 gigabytes of software, all compressed onto one cd rom, using cloop compression.

Download

Virtual Linux 1.1 Beta i386 642MB.iso
md5sum: 1c248033fcb47d2454a5c0ddea3a1e71

 

theWall

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Web site: thewall.sourceforge.net
Origin: ?
Category: Firewall
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: PicoBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.2 | March 6, 2002

theWall – a collection of PicoBSD configuration trees and prebuild binaries for various platforms that provides NAT and firewall services for a small network. The goal of theWall project is to allow a user to get going quickly without having to learn the details of building a PicoBSD release.

Features:
– Built from PicoBSD/FreeBSD 4.5
– ipfw based firewall with natd
– users may login via telnet or locally
– ftp (client), tar and gzip are provided to facilitate transferring additional programs to flash based systems.
– It is not necessary to compile anything or even have access to a FreeBSD system to configure and run theWall.
– Network bootable, flash based and floppy based versions are available.

Download

theWall PC-DHCP 2.0 i386 2,08MB.tgz
md5sum: 64fb91fb8937297b4e71f1519026b499

 

WarLinux

WarLinux

Web site: sourceforge.net/projects/warlinux/
Origin: ?
Category: Security
Desktop environment: text
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.5 | September 17, 2002

WarLinux – a micro/small Linux distribution for Wardrivers. It is available on a disk and bootable CD.

It’s main intended use is for systems administrators that want to audit and evaluate thier wireless network installations. Should be handy for wardriving also.

Download

WarLinux 0.5 i386 53MB.iso
md5sum: 3af42cfebb025e769502ae1dfaf93baa

 

White Glove

White Glove

Web site: all.net/WG/index.html
Origin: USA ?
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Blackbox ?
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent ?
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 3.0.2 | 2002 ?

White Glove – a commercial Linux distribution developed by Fred Cohen & Associates. White Glove was available as a paid CD, shipped via standard mail service, after purchased it from the developer.

White Glove was offered as two versions of youe choice: Bootable CD and Bootable Super CD.

The standard White Glove distribution is a bootable 180Meg CD-ROM. It comes complete with firewall software, drivers for most Ethernet cards and Disks, a wide range of networking and other amazing tools, and even complete and secure web and DNS servers. It includes an on-CD manual and tutorial, menu-based services from the X11 graphical user interface, and a set of tools that meet or exceed those you are used to today. It’s easy to use, easily fits in your shirt pocket, fast to boot and run, reliable, secure, and inexpensive. It is described in detail on these web pages. Select from the menu above for more of these details.

Recovery CD is designed for recovering your files from failing Windows or other PC-based systems. The computer boots from the CD, you tell it an IP address (or to use DHCP) and it makes all of the files available over SMB (the Windows network neighborhood) so you can copy them to other systems. Typical startup time is under 1 minute. Press here for more details.

Boot from the Bootable CD and the computer comes up in Linux.
– Local disks and disk partitions are identified, characterized, and mounted read-only.
– Local networking cards are identified and configured for use, but not initiated.
– Other devices are identified and made available for use.
– The booted system is firewalled from remote access to inhibit attempted access.
– In ‘diskless’ mode the CD removes itself from the system within a minute of bootup.

Use Linux directly (Super CD).
– Clean disk areas of contraband on-site.
– Clean and reformat systems for new applications.
– Use this platform to access remote capabilities and as a normal user system.
– Join IRC chat sessions, cruise the web, debug networks, and configure as a firewall.
– Do anything else Linux can do.

The Bootable Super CD was an innovation in low-cost, flexible, portable system tools. The Bootable Super CD provided a mini-CD-ROM complete with help, software, and remote access capabilities.

In short, the Bootable CD and Bootable Super CD provided a complete on-site analysis capability for those times when you can’t bring in your own special hardware to do the task or remove the systems from the site to capture and analyze evidence.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

DemoLinux

DemoLinux Gnome

DemoLinux KDE

Web site: www.demolinux.org
Origin: France
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Gnome, KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: Debian
Wikipedia: DemoLinux
Media: Live CD
The last version | Released: 3.0.1 | January 20, 2002

DemoLinux – one of the first Live CD Linux distributions, and was created to make it possible to use Linux without having to install it on the hard disk. It is the first Linux Live CD making possible to use the system in graphic mode and without any stage of configuration.

Version 1 was based on Mandrake Linux (now Mandriva Linux), versions 2 and 3 used a mechanism independent of the distribution and were distributed mainly on a Debian basis.

Version 3.0 now introduces the Xvesa X server, replacing the framebuffer used before, which depended on VESA 2.0 cards. We now handle PCI sound cards, Lucent winmodems, Reiserfs version 3.5.x, certain USB peripherals and several other 2.2.18 kernel devices. As for version 2.0, DemoLinux 3 heavily uses a transparent compression schema that allows to sotre over a gigabyte of applications, including GNOME and KDE and the StarOffice office suite.

To try out DemoLinux, you need a PC equipped with a CD-ROM and at least 32 Mb of RAM for simple graphics interfaces, 64 for advanced graphics interfaces, 128 to use StarOffice.

DemoLinux project was composed of 3 people, all based at the Paris VII University of Paris: Vincent Balat, Roberto Di Cosmo and Jean-Vincent Loddo.

The project was under development between 2000 and 2002.

Download

DemoLinux 3.0.1 i386 665MB.iso
md5sum: aff3baee4942eaeb31b1914d5637a654

 

Kondara MNU/Linux

Kondara MNU/Linux

Web site: www.kondara.org (not active)
Origin: Japan
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: AfterStep, Blackbox, Fluxbox, GNOME, KDE, WindowMaker
Architecture: x86
Based on: Red Hat
Wikipedia (JA): Kondara MNU/Linux
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.1 | March 18, 2002

Kondara MNU/Linux – a Linux distribution based on the Red Hat Linux and is precompiled for Pentium or Alpha systems.
The main focus of Kondara MNU/Linux appears to be on creating an open source distribution that supports Japanese and places heavy emphasis on graphics.

Kondara comes in two versions: one that is aimed at desktop systems and another that is aimed at server systems. This clearly shows that a Linux system can work equally well as desktop workstation, server or both at once.

Kondara MNU/Linux includes a separate applications CD-ROM, packed with RPM packages, along with Sun’s StarOffice 5.2. As in most RPM packages, there are separate directories for i586 (Intel), Alpha, and noarch (short for no architecture) for packages not specific to any architecture.

The “MNU” is an expression of a sound made when you touch a penguin, and is derived from “Mount is Not Umount”.

The project was under development between 1999 and 2002.

Download

No download is available
md5sum:

 

V2_OS

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Web site: http://v2.nl/archive/works/v2_os
Origin: Netherlands
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GUI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.7 | April 3, 2002

V2_OS – an open source operating system, created by V2_Lab, International Lab for the Unstable Media, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Since V2_Lab released the source code to the kernel and modules, a lot of developers from all over the world are working with it, and help to make V2_OS grow.

V2_OS is the fastest operating system available for the 386+ PC. Everything in this system is focused on speed: the architecture, the file system, its avoidance of virtualization and of course, the choice of development language: V2_OS is written in 100% pure 32 bit assembler.

When you boot V2_OS from a floppy, it does not touch your harddisks. Only if you run the Format or the Syscopy command, you ask V2_OS to copy itself to the harddisks. Only do this when you know what your doing. Even then we suggest you test this on an empty harddisk or with a disk without any important data.

The native filesystem of V2_OS is V2_FS. It is a very fast filesystem since it does not suffer from things like defragmentation or slack.

To make a V2_OS boot floppy from DOS, you need: boot.v2s; system16.v2s; system32.v2s and writeos.exe. Just put these files in a directory; place a emtpy 1.44meg floppy in a: and run writeos.exe.

The project been under development beetwen 1999 and 2002.
V2_OS has been created by Joost Faassen and was maintained by himself and other contributors.

Download

V2_OS i386 856KB.iso
md5sum: 146da6411f30155942bc39e853dd87be
V2_OS i386 6.5KB.img
md5sum: 83484dd9c4ca51c9e38d273a7f4e3b7e
V2_OS i386 288KB.zip
md5sum: 1b6071658e297c7ca92a1a9c862467a5

 

Plan 9

Plan 9

Web site: http://plan9.bell-labs.com/plan9/
Origin: USA
Category: Specialist
Desktop environment: Rio
Architecture: x86, x86_64, MIPS, DEC Alpha, SPARC, PowerPC, ARM
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Plan 9
Media: Live CD/USB
The last version | Released: 4 | 2002
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: Plan 9

Plan 9 – a distributed operating system, originally developed by the Computing Sciences Research Center at Bell Labs between the mid-1980s and 2002. Its original designers and authors were Ken Thompson, Rob Pike, Dave Presotto, and Phil Winterbottom.

Plan 9 demonstrates a new and often cleaner way to solve most systems problems. The system as a whole is likely to feel tantalizingly familiar to Unix users but at the same time quite foreign.

Plan 9 is an operating system kernel but also a collection of accompanying software. The bulk of the software is predominantly new, written for Plan 9 rather than ported from Unix or other systems. The window system, compilers, file server, and network services are all freshly written for Plan 9. Although classic Unix programs like dc, ed, and troff have been brought along, they are often in an updated form.

Starting with the release of Fourth edition on April 2002, the full source code of Plan 9 from Bell Labs was freely available under Lucent Public License 1.02.

There is an open source fork of Plan 9 called 9front (or Plan9front) being still under active development.

Download

Plan 9 4 90MB.iso.zip
md5sum: e5be8ff34c216b9193059c399031ceb5
Plan 9 4 USB Image 89MB.zip
md5sum: 0d365922b98828afd3e23cfcb82f28d8