United Linux

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Web site: unitedlinux.com (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: openSUSE
Wikipedia: United Linux
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.0 | November 19, 2002

United Linux – a consortium of Linux distributors which created a common base distribution for enterprise use. The founding members of United Linux were SUSE, Turbolinux, Conectiva and Caldera International.

United Linux 1.0 is a business-oriented system that is stable, scalable and reliable, with a quality that is as good as expensive commercial operating systems. UL 1.0 was initially available in English, Japanese, Simplified Chinese (PRC), Korean, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, German, Hungarian and French. Manufacturers of this distribution list among the greatest advantages: compliance with standards, scalability, wide availability, security. The hardware platforms include: Intel (32 and 64-bit), AMD, PowerPC (IBM eServer iSeries and pSeries) and IBM eServer zSeries. United Linux is capable of supporting up to 64 gigabytes of RAM.

The official “release party” of the 1.0 was made at Comdex, and the sponsors of the ceremony were IBM and Hewlett-Packard.

The project ended on January 22, 2004.

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MIZI Linux

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Web site: mizi.com (not active)
Origin: South Korea
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GNOME, IceWM, KDE, WindowMaker
Architecture: x86
Based on: Red Hat
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.0.4 | September 14, 2002

MIZI Linux – a commercial Linux distribution based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, aimed at business, school, office and home users.

The deployment utilized the GNOME, KDE, WindowMaker, and IceWM desktop environments, and supports the 32-bit x86 computer architecture.

The first version was launched in 1998. The latest version was 2.0.4 which was launched on September 14, 2002.

The project was developed by the MIZI Research, a South Korean company founded in 1997, acquired by Wind River Systems in 2008.

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Caldera

Caldera OpenLinux

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: LST Power Linux
Wikipedia: Caldera OpenLinux
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 3.1.1 | June 1, 2002

Caldera OpenLinux – a based on LST Power Linux, a Slackware-derived distribution that had been maintained by Linux Support Team since 1993 and the first to come with a Linux 2.0 kernel. It was developed by Caldera Systems (now SCO Group) since 1998.

Caldera Systems created a full featured GUI system administration tool called Caldera Open Administration System (COAS). The tool was a unified, easy to use administration tool with a modular design. With its scalability and broad scope abilities.

Source: wikipedia.org; License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License;

Download

Caldera OpenLinux 3.1 Workstation i386 661MB.iso
md5sum: 9435023bc5fae5086dbb6505fabcd1dd
Caldera OpenLinux 3.1 Server i386 637MB.iso
md5sum: 25fee2586812ccf5bc5dd02cfef8012b

 

AdmuLinux

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Web site: admulinux.org (not active)
Origin: Philippines
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: ?
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 2.0 ? | 2002 ?

AdmuLinux – a full-featured graphical Linux development system that runs on a CD, intented for Ateneo students doing software development, and system administration, maintained by Dr. Pablo Manalastas, Philippines.

The last version of AdmuLinux 2.0 (?) has KDE desktop environment 2.1.1, and lots of development tools for Palm.

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CompactBSD

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Web site: compactbsd.sourceforge.net
Origin: ?
Category: Embedded
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.1.0 | August 22, 2002

CompactBSD – a set of tools that allow you to compress OpenBSD onto a small (32MB) compact flash card for use in small embedded servers. CompactBSD can be used to power wireless hot spots, which is what FatPort uses it for.

CompactBSD offers the easiest way to get OpenBSD up and running on Compact Flash-based systems such as the FatPointOEM. In order to use the ZComax 200mW PCMCIA wireless card in your FatPointOEM box, you will need to add a patch to the OpenBSD 3.1 kernel.

CompactBSD runs on an i386-class box running OpenBSD3.1, it also requires that Python 2.1.2 be installed.

The project developer is Ken Simpson.

Download

CompactBSD 0.1.0 i386 348KB.tgz
md5sum: 2b4457d09216c8122385d0dde15df831

 

Biatchux

Biatchux

Web site: biatchux.dmzs.com
Origin: USA
Category: Specialist
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.1.0.6b (?) | March 13, 2002

Biatchux (DMZS-Biatchux Bootable CD) – a bootable CD distribution of which the goal is to provide a freely available immediately deployable platform for performing forensic analysis, incident response, data recovery, host virus scanning and penetration/vulnerability assessment.

This is still in beta but has proven stable for my needs (developers), which prompted it’s creation. I have tried to ensure >2G file handling capability but have not yet tested with any files greater than 2G. I am trusting Dave Dittrich’s advice and his findings toward proper environment setup for >2G.

It should work on AMD, Cyrix and 486’s or greater with 64M memory or greater (as with all things, more seems to be better, or at least more comfy!), and IDE or SCSI boot cd (selected scsi controllers only). Biatchux has now tested successfully on systems with only 64M Ram.

The project developer are William Salusky and David Zendzian.

Download

Biatchux 0.1.0.6b i386 60MB.iso
md5sum: 6e0802dac501923e4d920614e1c52e8b

 

Virtual Linux

Virtual Linux

Web site: www.virtual-linux.org (not active)
Origin: Sweden
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: Mandrake Linux
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.1 Beta | May 3, 2002

Virtual Linux – a derived from the Mandrake Linux operating system, modified to run directly from your cd rom drive.

With Virtual-Linux 1.1 you get about 1.6 gigabytes of software, all compressed onto one cd rom, using cloop compression.

Download

Virtual Linux 1.1 Beta i386 642MB.iso
md5sum: 1c248033fcb47d2454a5c0ddea3a1e71

 

theWall

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Web site: thewall.sourceforge.net
Origin: ?
Category: Firewall
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: PicoBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.2 | March 6, 2002

theWall – a collection of PicoBSD configuration trees and prebuild binaries for various platforms that provides NAT and firewall services for a small network. The goal of theWall project is to allow a user to get going quickly without having to learn the details of building a PicoBSD release.

Features:
– Built from PicoBSD/FreeBSD 4.5
– ipfw based firewall with natd
– users may login via telnet or locally
– ftp (client), tar and gzip are provided to facilitate transferring additional programs to flash based systems.
– It is not necessary to compile anything or even have access to a FreeBSD system to configure and run theWall.
– Network bootable, flash based and floppy based versions are available.

Download

theWall PC-DHCP 2.0 i386 2,08MB.tgz
md5sum: 64fb91fb8937297b4e71f1519026b499

 

WarLinux

WarLinux

Web site: sourceforge.net/projects/warlinux/
Origin: ?
Category: Security
Desktop environment: text
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.5 | September 17, 2002

WarLinux – a micro/small Linux distribution for Wardrivers. It is available on a disk and bootable CD.

It’s main intended use is for systems administrators that want to audit and evaluate thier wireless network installations. Should be handy for wardriving also.

Download

WarLinux 0.5 i386 53MB.iso
md5sum: 3af42cfebb025e769502ae1dfaf93baa

 

White Glove

White Glove

Web site: all.net/WG/index.html
Origin: USA ?
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Blackbox ?
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent ?
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 3.0.2 | 2002 ?

White Glove – a commercial Linux distribution developed by Fred Cohen & Associates. White Glove was available as a paid CD, shipped via standard mail service, after purchased it from the developer.

White Glove was offered as two versions of youe choice: Bootable CD and Bootable Super CD.

The standard White Glove distribution is a bootable 180Meg CD-ROM. It comes complete with firewall software, drivers for most Ethernet cards and Disks, a wide range of networking and other amazing tools, and even complete and secure web and DNS servers. It includes an on-CD manual and tutorial, menu-based services from the X11 graphical user interface, and a set of tools that meet or exceed those you are used to today. It’s easy to use, easily fits in your shirt pocket, fast to boot and run, reliable, secure, and inexpensive. It is described in detail on these web pages. Select from the menu above for more of these details.

Recovery CD is designed for recovering your files from failing Windows or other PC-based systems. The computer boots from the CD, you tell it an IP address (or to use DHCP) and it makes all of the files available over SMB (the Windows network neighborhood) so you can copy them to other systems. Typical startup time is under 1 minute. Press here for more details.

Boot from the Bootable CD and the computer comes up in Linux.
– Local disks and disk partitions are identified, characterized, and mounted read-only.
– Local networking cards are identified and configured for use, but not initiated.
– Other devices are identified and made available for use.
– The booted system is firewalled from remote access to inhibit attempted access.
– In ‘diskless’ mode the CD removes itself from the system within a minute of bootup.

Use Linux directly (Super CD).
– Clean disk areas of contraband on-site.
– Clean and reformat systems for new applications.
– Use this platform to access remote capabilities and as a normal user system.
– Join IRC chat sessions, cruise the web, debug networks, and configure as a firewall.
– Do anything else Linux can do.

The Bootable Super CD was an innovation in low-cost, flexible, portable system tools. The Bootable Super CD provided a mini-CD-ROM complete with help, software, and remote access capabilities.

In short, the Bootable CD and Bootable Super CD provided a complete on-site analysis capability for those times when you can’t bring in your own special hardware to do the task or remove the systems from the site to capture and analyze evidence.

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