386BSD

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  • Web site: 386bsd.org
  • Origin: USA
  • Category: Server
  • Desktop environment: CLI
  • Architecture: x86
  • Based on: UNIX
  • Wikipedia: 386BSD
  • Media: Install
  • The last version | Released: 2.0 | August 2016

386BSD – a derived from 4.3BSD, the first open source Berkeley UNIX operating system. It was the progenitor of Linux, iOS, and Android. Beginning with “A Modest Proposal” in 1989, 386BSD broke from proprietary systems by having publicly accessible code and documentation.

386BSD Release 0.0 was distributed in 1993 in tandem to the popular “Porting Unix to the 386” article series published in Dr. Dobb’s Journal.
Release 0.1 quickly followed, enhanced with contributions throughout the globe.

386BSD Release 1.0, aka Jolix, was a break from earlier Berkeley UNIX systems through use of a modular architecture. 386BSD Release 2.0 built upon the modular framework to create self-healing components. Each release introduced novel mechanisms from role-based security to polymorphic protocols.

386BSD.org provides the opportunity to interact with the original source, articles and supporting materials, and a live demo of 386BSD Release 2.0.

386BSD is a mother of free BSD systems today, such as: BSD/386, NetBSD, FreeBSD, BSD/OS, Darwin, OpenBSD and others.

The project authors are Lynne and William Jolitz.

 

KeyKOS

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Web site: cap-lore.com/CapTheory/KK/
Origin: USA
Category: Microkernel, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: IBM S/370, IBM Mainframe
Based on: GNOSIS
Wikipedia: KeyKOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | ?

KeyKOS – an operating environment for S/370 computers which provides a high level of security, reliability, performance, and productivity. It allows emulation of other environments such as VM, MVS, and POSIX.

When Tymshare started work on KeyKOS in the early 1970s, there were solid business requirements justifying the project. With the price of main storage dropping, applications were too tightly bound to disk storage. Because Tymshare’s systems were accessed from around the world, continuous operation was a requirement. Existing systems were prone to failure from many causes, both hardware and software. They did not recover from these failures gracefully. These systems required significant operator intervention in both normal operation and during recovery. They did not provide the security needed to allow competing organizations to share programs and data in a controlled manner where it made economic and social sense.

Because of these deficiencies, Tymshare decided its best option was to build a system of its own. This system had a number of design goals including: high security, high reliability, economical processing of high transaction volumes, and enhanced productivity for managers, programmers, users, operators, and hardware.

KeyKOS provides persistent virtual address spaces where programs may keep data. The system caches frequently referenced data in main storage. When several processes are accessing the same data, for example the CMS “S” disk, the data blocks involved are likely to already in main storage, improving access times. Only one copy will be maintained in main storage, improving storage utilization. Persistent virtual storage allows the kernel to globally optimize disk arm movement and rotational latency. The KeyKOS implementation also provides complete separation of physical and logical DASD management. No unprivileged program is aware of the type or configuration of real DASD in the system.

KeyKOS has a system-wide checkpoint which periodically saves the state of the entire system. If a system outage occurs, the system will restart from the last checkpoint with all data and processes in a consistent state as of that checkpoint. The KeyTXF transaction processing system will recover database updates to the point of failure. Should a CPU fail, the DASD can be shared with or switched to a backup CPU to quickly restore service by restarting from the last checkpoint.

Data mirroring stores multiple copies of data for reliability and performance. The KeyKOS system continues to operate if a mirrored disk fails. When the disk is repaired, or a replacement disk is formatted and brought online, the mirrored data is automatically restored to that disk. Performance is enhanced by having several paths to a particular piece of data. The full function of the system is available in essentially any S/370 computer language. A standard invocation protocol permits high level languages to invoke low level function and low level languages to invoke high level function, enhancing the usefulness of all languages.

The KeyKOS system is designed for unattended operation. The only common operator functions are mounting tapes and servicing the printer.

The KeyKOS system is designed for continuous operation. Full system backup dumps may be taken while the system is running. When a dump has completed, the backup tapes contain an image of all data and processes in the system at a consistent instant of time. avoiding inconsistency in the data. These “tape checkpoints” are conceptually independent of the physical DASD type or configuration. They may be restored to different physical devices if necessary.

KeyKOS/370 runs on System/370-compatible single processor CPUs. It currently supports 3330, 3350, and 3380 count key data format disks and 3370 FBA format disks. System software includes the context switcher and two command systems.

Copyright © 1985, 1987, 1988, 1990 Key Logic. All rights reserved.
Permission to reproduce and redistribute this document in paper or electronic form is hereby granted, provided that this copyright notice remains intact.

KeyKOS is a predecessor of the EROS and its successors are CapROS and Coyotos operating systems.

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EROS

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Web site: www.eros-os.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Microkernel, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: KeyKOS
Wikipedia: EROS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.1 | April 18, 2001

EROS (Extremely Reliable Operating System) – an operating system being implemented at the University of Pennsylvania, as a clean-room reconstruction of an earlier system, KeyKOS. The system merges some very old ideas in operating systems with some newer ideas about performance and resource management. The result is a small, secure, real-time operating system that provides orthogonal persistence.

EROS is a pure capability system. Authority in the system is conveyed exclusivly by secure capabilities, down to the granularity of individual pages.

The EROS kernel itself is implemented using multiple kernel-mode threads. This improves the performance of EROS drivers, makes them simpler to code, and greatly simplifies the design of the kernel. In addition, it enables selected kernel functionality to be preempted by higher priority user activities.

Because EROS processes are persistent, processes can hold authorities in their own right rather than inheriting them from the user. This enables a rich variety of options for security and access control that are impossible in systems lacking persistent processes.

EROS developed beginning in 1991 by The EROS Group, LLC., the Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Features include automatic data and process persistence, some preliminary real-time support, and capability-based security. EROS is purely a research operating system, and was never deployed in real world use. As of 2005, development has stopped in favor of two successor systems, CapROS and Coyotos.

The project founder is Jonathan Shapiro. He is also the driving force behind Coyotos, which is an “evolutionary step” beyond the EROS operating system.

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Lineox

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Web site: www.lineox.net
Origin: Finland
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: Red Hat
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.096 | August 13, 2006

Lineox (Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux) – a series of versions of Lineox Enterprise Linux 4.0 which contain all the available bug and security fixes for Lineox Enterprise Linux 4.0 on the installation disks.

This saves both download and installation time. Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux is available for download as four CD-ROM images and a DVD-ROM image. The high speed download quota for one disk type version costs 10 € and 15 € for both versions. Lineox expects to release a new version of Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux once or twice a week.

Currently Always Current Lineox™ Enterprise Linux 4.x is available for x86 and x86_64 architectures, but we may add more architectures later.

The distribution was under active development between 2003 and 2006; closed down in 2009.

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FTOSX

FTOSX

Web site: www.ftlinuxcourse.club/FTOSX/index.html
Origin: Italy
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: Fedora
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2004 rc1 | September 8, 2004

FTOSX – a Linux distribution from Italy based on Fedora. It uses the KDE desktop environment and offers support to 32-bit x86 (i686) platform. The goal of the FTOSX Project is to work with the Linux community to build a complete, general-purpose operating system exclusively from open
source software, but specially to be a Personal Operating System.

The FTOSX Desktop Project starts in August 2000, to create a development environment to solve the Graphical User Interface under GNU/Linux OS.
The name “FTOSX” stand for “Future Technologies Operating System based on the Linux Kernel and the X Window System”, therefore, basically X stand for X Window System.

The name is similar to “MacOSX” from Apple Inc, that adopt UNIX inside the OS.
In the past years the FTOSX takes the direction to be the arena to Develop the Personal Operating System, originally called YourLinux.

FTOSX Desktop 2004 is optimized for Pentium PRO (and later) CPUs, but also supports Pentium-class CPUs. This approach has been taken because Pentium-class optimizations actually result in reduced performance for non-Pentium-class processors.
* Recommended for text-mode: 200 MHz Pentium-class or better
* Recommended for graphical: 400 MHz Pentium II or better

The first version was launched on June 19, 2003, the latest version was 2004 rc4 which was launched on September 8, 2004.
FTOSX was managed by a single person: Dr. Giovanni A. Orlando.

Download

FTOSX 2004 boot i386 4.1MB.iso
md5sum: 69e7897ba85c7c7ebfa86a264f332888
FTOSX 2004 diskboot i386 6.0MB.img
md5sum: c4557f4eb6c25f367d6b5a6d0ba48360

 

EvilEntity

EvilEntity

Web site: evilentity.com (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Enlightenment
Architecture: x86
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 0.2.5 | January 24, 2003

EvilEntity – a i686 based multimedia-focused desktop OS designed for desktop home computers and professional multimedia productivity. It provides the Linux user with a Linux system optimized for audio, video, and desktop work.

The project developer is David Martin.

Download

EvilEntity 0.2.5 i386 702MB.iso
md5sum: abab4870f20ebe7fe2a3545ebfe4c468

 

NetBSD/i386 Firewall

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Web site: firewall.dubbele.com
Origin: Netherlands ?
Category: Firewall
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: NetBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | November 22, 2001

NetBSD/i386 Firewall – a NetBSD based, a free highly portable UNIX-like operating system available for many platforms, from 64bit alpha servers to handheld devices. It is a free firewall solution for people with a permanent Internet connection. This includes most users of cable or ADSL services, but also businesses with leased lines. PPPoE support and PPTP support is available on CD.

The base system is kept as lean and mean as possible, but there’s plenty of room to add services, such as your own mail and web server.

The standard NetBSD install has been extensively modified to make install as simple and straightforward as possible, and it is geared towards people who have no Unix knowledge and do not intend to get any.

NetBSD/i386 Firewall supports all the hardware that is supported by a standard NetBSD install.

The minimal configuration for a NetBSD/Firewall system requires a 80486 processor, 8M of RAM and about 40M of disk space. A minimum install of NetBSD is 4 MB of RAM on a 80386, but for a busy firewall, it is recommended a bit higher than that. Of course, you’re free to experiment if you’ve got a 80386 with 4 MB of RAM. Any i386 or better CPU should work – genuine Intel or a compatible such as Cyrix, AMD, or NexGen.

Download

NetBSD/i386 Firewall boot i386 2.17MB.zip
md5sum: 9a3fde5896ba6a08f03da44ff3dacbdd

 

NetBoz Firewall

NetBoz Firewall

Web site: www.netboz.net (not active)
Origin: ?
Category: Firewall
Desktop environment: CLI, web interface
Architecture: x86
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.4 beta8 | May 20, 2003

NetBoz Firewall – a FreeBSD based CD-ROM firewall with a web administration interface. NetBoz works over standard FreeBSD services, giving maximum flexibility, ease of use and performance to corporate networks.

It does not use a hard disk, while all the settings are stored on a write-protectable diskette, making it virtually inmune to intrusions and power failures.

System requirements:
– Any 586 type CPU fits (Pentium or better):
* Pentium, Pentium Pro, Pentium II, Pentium III, Pentium 4 and its variants (Celeron) and the
* AMD line ( Am5x86, K5, K6, Athlon and Duron).
– The mother board must have a PCI bus. Its is desirable that it doesn’t have an integrated network card. If it has one and NetBoz is not able to detect it automatically, then it should be necessary to disable it from the BIOS and install an additional PCI network adapter.
– A minimum RAM of 64 MB, while 128 MB are enough for almost all the applications.

Download

NetBoz Firewall 1.4 beta8 i386 63,5MB.iso.gz
md5sum: ab1a3337e22d00c0e0aa8cfc8b76e604
NetBoz Firewall 1.2rc11 i386 53,9MB.iso.gz
md5sum: 268c6fc615bae717a9226af147caaf8b

 

TinyBSD

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Web site: tinybsd.org (not active)
Origin: Brazil
Category: Embedded Systems
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 8.2 | May 6, 2016

TinyBSD – a set of tools and shell scripts, part of the FreeBSD base system (/usr/src/tools/tools), designed to make the development of embedded systems based on FreeBSD as easy as possible. The TinyBSD script can be used on FreeBSD 5.x, 6.x and 7.x and 8-CURRENT to created a mini FreeBSD version.

The project is financed by Google Summer of Code 2008. The successor of NanoBSD, largely based on its code, supported by the FreeBSD team. It is available in the FreeBSD CVS repository. It allows you to reduce the system to about 30Mb. The same as its prototype allows you to customize the system kernel and ports – not packages (pkg) as in NanoBSD. It contains six pre-defined configurations, such as Wireless Acess Point, VPN, Firewall, bridge, wrap, default, and minimal.

The latest TinyBSD 8.2 Image was built on a 8.2-STABLE system. This is a general purpose TinyBSD image file designed to be written to a 40 – 42MB CF card. It is intended to act as a Wireless or Wired router/firewall.

Developers of the TinyBSD project are Jean Milanez Melo and Patrick Tracanelli.

Download

TinyBSD 8.2 Stable i386 6.1MB.tar.xz
md5sum: b3de4264aeac077344c449e4cbf5301f
TinyBSD Current set of scripts 54KB.tar.gz
md5sum: 9f1f9f4ac8402be1822bfd5323f495af

 

SprezzOS

SprezzOS

Web site: www.sprezzos.com (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Debian
Wikipedia:
Media: Install CD
The last version | Released: 1.1.1 | April 29, 2013

SprezzOS – a Debian “unstable” based Linux distribution dedicated to the lost arts of high performance, robust computing, and freewheeling hackery.

SprezzOS is derived from Debian, and is an active member of the Debian Derivatives Census. While SprezzOS is a product of Sprezzatech, which retains final control over its definition, contributions from the community are actively welcomed.

All SprezzOS development is open, and has been from the beginning. SprezzOS at its heart is a rolling, rapidly-evolving operating system atop the Linux kernel; when the term “SprezzOS” is used by itself, it is this continuum (the “trunk”) which is referenced.

It is intended that users generally install this trunk, and rely on its frequent updates. From time to time, a snapshot will be taken of the distribution, defining a more static release. New installation media will be released as minor version updates to these releases as the need arises.

Download

SprezzOS 1.1.1 i386 321MB.iso
md5sum: 96c0162135ec5a0cc61ead505934cadb