NX-DOS

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Web site: sourceforge.net/projects/nxdos (not active)
Origin: ?
Category: Embedded
Desktop environment: cli
Architecture: x86
Based on: ?
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.2013 (?) | 2005 (?)

NX-DOS – a 16/32bit X86 operating system for embedded applications.

NX-DOS is a free DOS-compatible 16/32bit operating system aimed at embedded x86 systems.
An open source, MS-DOS operating system that is capable of running most DOS applications.

It uses a RXDOS compatible memory manager.

Project went open source in 2005, after years of private development.

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Voltalinux

Web site: voltalinux.sicurezzarete.com
Origin: Italy
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.2 beta | March 11, 2009

Voltalinux – a GNU/Linux distribution based on Slackware Linux and the pkgsrc package system from NetBSD. The pkgsrc package manager is available to the Linux users.

The distribution is mainly intended for server use but you can be used as a desktop OS too.

Some key features of “Voltalinux”:
· Slackware 100% compatible
· no need to compile anything to have a working system
· many prebuilt kernels
· more than 5400 ports ready to be used.

Requirements:
· i486 processor or newer
· 32 MB of RAM memory
· about 400 MB of free disk space

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ROOT GNU/Linux

ROOT GNU/Linux

Web site: rootlinux.org (not active)
Origin: Sweden
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE, WindowMaker
Architecture: x86
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia:
Media: Install CD
The last version | Released: 1.4 | May 2009

ROOT GNU/Linux – an advanced GNU/Linux operating system which aims to be stable, flexible and fast. ROOT is a general-purpose system which includes software for both server and workstation use.

ROOT includes the modern and powerful desktop environment KDE. It uses a simple but powerful ports system to build the latest software from source automatically. The system currently only runs on Intel 686 compatible processors. This project aims to create the best, highest possible quality GNU/Linux system for experienced users.

Versions: 1.2 (Erreur); 1.3 (Noodle); 1.4 (Pommes).

The project founder is John Eriksson.

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ROOT GNU/Linux 1.4 i586 701MB.iso
md5sum: f02f436b2f3ee097f2e1d4f206e2719a

 

DEMOS

DEMOS on WIndows

Web site: (not active)
Origin: Russia (Soviet Union)
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Motorola 68020, PDP-11, CM 1700, XT Clones
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: DEMOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 3.0 ? | May 1983 ?

DEMOS / Демос (Dialogovaya Edinaya Mobilnaya Operatsionnaya Sistema / Диалоговая Единая Мобильная Операционная Система) – a Soviet version of Unix that included portions of AT&T Unix, portions from BSD, and some parts translated into Russian, and other utilities written in Russian.

The system development been started by Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in 1982, and later development was doing with cooperation of DEMOS Co-operative.

It was developed for:
– SM-4 (a PDP-11/40 clone)
– SM-1600

It was ported to:
– Elektronika-1082
– BESM
– ES EVM
– clones of VAX-11(SM-1700)
– PC/XT
– Elektronika-85 (a clone of DEC Professional)
– Motorola 68020-based microcomputers

The project been closed in 1991.

The screenshot source: gunkies.org; author: Neozeed; license: GNU Free Documentation License 1.2.

 

OpenStep

OpenStep

Web site: gnustep.org/resources/OpenStepSpec/OpenStepSpec.html
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment:
Architecture: IA-32, PA-RISC, SPARC
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: OpenStep
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | ?

OpenStep – an object-oriented operating system that uses any modern operating system as its core. Mainly created by NeXT. NeXT Computer Inc, and Sun Microsystems Inc. teamed up in late 1993 to push a free object layer API based on the NeXTSTEP object system. This agreement evolved into the OpenStep specification which was published by NeXT in a first draft back in summer 1994.

There is a distinction between OpenStep, which is an API specification, and OPENSTEP (capitalized) which is a specific implementation of OpenStep developed by NeXT. Although it was originally created on a Unix-based Mach kernel (just like the NeXTSTEP core), OPENSTEP versions were also available on Solaris and Microsoft Windows NT. Therefore, OPENSTEP libraries (which were supplied with the OPENSTEP system) are actually a subset of the original OpenStep specification.

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VectorLinux

VectorLinux

Web site: vectorlinux.com
Origin: Canada
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Xfce
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia: VectorLinux
Media: Live, Install
The last version | Released: 7.2 | August 28, 2017
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: VectorLinux

VectorLinux – a Linux distribution based on Slackware. The project is founded by Robert S. Lange and Darrell Stavem and is being developed with community help.

It uses ‘slapt-get’ for package management or the “gslapt” GUI. Users have ability to independently control packages by installing packages without dependencies (for advanced users). Vector uses .tlz packages (LZMA-packed), though .tbz and .tgz are supported too.

The system is released for hardware architecture i486, and from July 2012 also for x86_64.
VectorLinux includes pre-installed non-free software and drivers.

Download

VectorLinux 7.2 Light Final i586 653MB.iso
md5sum: 40c067095ab92e19699791eab67aca07
VectorLinux 7.2 STD Final i586 872MB.iso
md5sum: c86de6230e7158bfc47876863ec35367
VectorLinux 7.2 STD Final Live i586 1.07GB.iso
md5sum: 818f2486b691c29333466a4f7386cb51

VectorLinux 7.2 Light Final x86_64 655MB.iso
md5sum: 3228f4c69272dd7b97c38d6d12f8c56c
VectorLinux 7.2 STD Final x86_64 868MB.iso
md5sum: 872ec13a4848de94552408fe12152b25
VectorLinux 7.2 Light Live x86_64 750MB.iso
md5sum: 700bf4704696a1407214c0ca140eb864

 

NeXTSTEP

NeXTSTEP

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment:
Architecture: Intel x86, Motorola 68000, SPARC, PA-RISC
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: NeXTSTEP
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.2 Pre-release 2 | September 1997

NeXTSTEP – an object-oriented, multitasking operating system created by NeXT Computer, Inc. a company founded in 1985 by Apple Computer co-founder Steve Jobs.

This system was created on the base of Mach microkernel and BSD Unix system code. NeXTStep was oriented to work in a graphical environment. It had a very well-prepared, intuitive user interface, based on object-oriented architecture, quite different from both the most popular then Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Mac OS. The visualization engine was based on Postscript, which on one hand made it very demanding in terms of hardware (considerable demand for memory) and on other hand an ideal solution for industrial and designer workstations.

NeXTSTEP 1.0 was released 18 September 1989 after a couple of hits in 1986, and last Release 3.3 in early 1995, and previously worked only on the Motorola 68000 CPU family (especially the original black boxes) and the generic IBM compatible x86/Intel, Sun SPARC , and HP PA-RISC. About the time 3.2 releases NeXT teamed up with Sun Microsystems to develop OpenStep, cross-platform implementation of the standard (for Sun Solaris, Microsoft Windows, and NeXT Mach kernel version) based on NEXTSTEP 3.2.

In February 1997, after the purchase of NeXT by Apple, it became the source of the popular operating systems macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.

The NeXTSTEP screenshot’s author: Gürkan Sengün; source: Wikipedia; License: GNU GPL.

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Onebase Linux

Onebase Linux

Web site: onebaselinux.com (not active)
Origin: India
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.0 | August 17, 2005

Onebase Linux – a multi-purpose operating system (OS) based on the linux kernel for PC (x86) with its own package management and administration tools.

Main features are:
– Package Management System – This formed the basis this project. A versatile package manager with seamless support for binary and source packages. It enables easy management and updation of the system with robust functionality.
– Onebase Portal – A comprehensive system management center that is modular and provides various tools for desktop, hardware, system, network and package administration
– Infrastructure – A remodeled boot system and improved file-hierarchy with per package folders (under /OL-apps) yet fully maintaining UNIX compatibility.
– Specialized versions – Onebase Linux provides different installers like Net-Installer, HD-installer that comes with OnebaseGo LiveCD. And regularly introduces special LiveCD editions such as for Games, Development etc.
– More features – Other stuff includes – System Restore points, Automate Tasks, Security Updates, Network OLM, Concurrent Installs, Beta gallery and much more…

An install iso provides the flexible Net-Installer (requires Internet) meant for Linux Professionals and Business who want a customized system to suit their needs.
The HD-Installer provided by OnebaseGo is contrast to this, it is fast, fixed and pre-configured. Which would be useful to users who need a quick install or with slow Net connection besides other advantages.

Flavors:
– OnebaseGo is the main LiveCD that is meant of for satisfying all basic computing needs. View its “features” page to know the important software included in it.
– The special editions of OnebaseGo such as Games, Develop focuses on a particular field by providing more related software, documentation and tools for it.
– For example, a programmer would choose “DevelopGo” since it provides lots of IDE, dev utilities, offline developer guides and over 11 languages to program with.

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SunOS

null

Web site: oracle.com/us/sun/index.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: 386i, Sun, SPARC
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: SusOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.1.4 | November 1994

SunOS – a UNIX based OS derived from BSD, created by Sun Microsystems. Initially released in 1982, it was the standard OS on Sun Machines at that time. Platforms supported by this OS were the Motorola 68000, the Sun 386i, and the SPARC.

Sun-1’s were the very first models ever produced by Sun. The earliest ran Unisoft V7 UNIX; SunOS 1.x was introduced later. According to some sources, fewer than 200 Sun-1’s were ever produced; they are certainly rare. The switch from Motorola 68000’s to 68010’s occurred during the Sun-1’s reign. Some models are reported to have 3Mbit Ethernet taps as well as 10Mbit.
68000-based Sun-1’s are not supported by SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-1’s may be the same as the last version to support Sun-2’s, since the 100U CPU boards are the same part.

Sun-2’s were introduced in the early 1980’s and were Sun’s first major commercial success. While not as popular or as common as the later Sun-3’s, they did well and there are still quite a few in circulation in the home/collector-used market.
All Sun-2’s are based on the Motorola 68010 and run SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-2’s was 4.0.3. Early Sun-2’s were Multibus; later models were VME, which Sun continued to use through the Sun-3 era and well into the Sun-4 line.

Sun switched to using the Motorola 68020 with the introduction of the Sun-3’s. A few later models had 68030’s, but by that time Sun was already moving toward SPARC processors. All models either have a 68881 or 68882 FPU installed stock or at least have a socket for one. All models which are not in pizza box chassis are VMEbus. Two out of three pizza box models have a “P4” connector which can take a framebuffer; the exception is the 3/50.
Support for Sun-3’s was introduced in SunOS 3.0. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-3’s was 4.1.1U1.
During the Sun-3 era, Sun introduced the handy practice of putting the model number on the Sun badge on the front of the chassis.
There are two different kernel architectures in the Sun-3 model line. All 68020-based models are “sun3” architecture; 68030-based models (the 3/80 and 3/4xx) are “sun3x” architecture.

The Sun 386i models, based on the Intel 80386 processor, were introduced when 80386-based IBM PC/AT clones were starting to become widespread. Intel had finally produced a chip sufficiently capable (32-bit, among other things) to allow porting SunOS, and using an Intel processor and an ISA bus offered the ability to run MS-DOS applications without speed-draining emulation. Unfortunately, they were a dismal failure.
Support for Sun-386i’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0. The 386i SunOS releases came from Sun’s East Coast division, so 386i SunOS was not identical to the standard version with the same number. The last released version of SunOS to support Sun-386i’s was 4.0.2; there are a few copies of 4.0.3Beta (with OpenLook 2.0) floating around.

Support for Sun-4’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0, although there was a special variant of SunOS 3.2 for Sun-4’s which was shipped with some very early units. Since this product line is still current, it is still in general supported by SunOS, which has mutated to become part of Solaris. Support for some earlier models has been dropped, and some later models require at least 4.0.3c, 4.1.1, or Solaris 2.x.

SunOS took a shift starting with version 5.0, which changed its base from BSD to Unix System V Release 4, and became Solaris. The last release under the SunOS name was Version 4.1.4, released in November 1994.

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GNOSIS

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Web site: cis.upenn.edu/~KeyKOS/Gnosis/Gnosis.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: IBM ?
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: GNOSIS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | ?

GNOSIS (Great New Operating System In the Sky) – an example of a completely different kind of operating system. Gnosis was developed by TYMSHARE as a proprietary control program and it also developed proprietary application packages to run on it. GNOSIS was based on the research of Norman Hardy, Dale E. Jordan, Bill Frantz, Charlie Landau, Jay Jonekait, et al. McDonnell Douglas bought Tymshare, Inc. and then sold it in 1984 to Key Logic.

Programs under Gnosis are built out of protection domains with firewalls between them. Domains are small, simple, and cheap.
Domains communicate through doors in the firewalls, called capabilities. Capabilities are a simple, uniform, efficient means of representing authority.

There are several significant factors which make it possible.

* First, and foremost, the Gnosis concept of distinct domains without implicit interactions between them results in simpler programs. Because of this, we have had to spend a great deal of time designing the interfaces between these domains to insure that adequate function exists in each; but perhaps even that is a benefit since we will know exactly how the system goes together. The basic design of Gnosis will ensure that no compromises to the design occur during the implementation.

* Second, because individual components are completely isolated from each other, except for the prescribed interfaces, it is a simple matter to implement each domain independently of the remainder of the operating system. Very little scaffolding is required. We went to install the CMS editor in Gnosis and noted all of the things we thought ought to be there as co-requisites, things like a command language to call the editor, a file system, a loader, catalog facilities, and so on. To our surprise, we discovered that we didn’t need any of those facilities. We could just connect the editor directly to the terminal handler and test it. This made development go much quicker.

* Third, we have been able to coexist with, and take advantage of, CMS during the early going. We expect to use CMS services for quite some while for compiling programs and so forth. Thus our “critical mass” of code is very much smaller that it would otherwise be.

* Fourth, the basic design of Gnosis allows us to write most of the operating system as user code, which means we will be able to eliminate a lot of duplication of effort in terms of testing tools, etc. The system will also be much simpler because all of the details of the hardware are masked in the kernel. Consequently no domain programmer need ever deal with them, which makes the domains simpler, and also greatly reduces the impact of any hardware changes. We have tended to follow the advice of Fred Brooks in the Mythical Man-month, where he suggests “be prepared to throw the first one away.” We have implemented each domain with the simplest possible algorithms in order to test the design. Later we will have to discard many of these domains and rewrite them with high performance algorithms which obey the same interface specifications. Most of these first attempt domains can be implemented In a matter of days.

* Last, but certainly not least, we have a relatively high technology “office of the future” system called AUGMENT which we are using to keep all of our design notes as well as our user documentation. The use of this system,will save us a significant amount of labor as we develop a user community over the next several years.

The combination of these facilities has made it possible for us to implement a great deal of function very quickly. As Norm mentioned earlier, we have only just started running our first domains recently. Yet we expect to be able to have a significant online database application operational within a year.

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