ARX

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: United Kingdom
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: ARM
Based on: UNIX-like
Wikipedia: ARX_(operating_system)
Media: Install
The last version | Released: unreleased

ARX – a Mach-like operating system written in Modula-2+[3] developed by Acorn Computers Ltd. ARX is a comprehensive OS going beyond UNIX but backwards compatible is expected to be provided with a layer on top. Lightweight processes, share a common address space, amounts to little more than multiple program pointers with no mutual protection. Obviously this means that switching between such processes (called threads) is extremely fast.

ARX it has written in Modula 2 and is reputed to UNIX like. An interesting point for RISC haters is that the code compiled for the Archimedes is less than twice the size of the same code compiled for the 32016, which is very definately a CISC (Complex Instruction Set .. Computer).

Apparantly Acorn are not releasing details of the ARX operating system because they do not want to “confuse the market”. Even software houses, as a whole, have not been told about ARX. Whilst this may be just because ARX isn’t ready for release yet my paranoid brain worries about it’s price.

It was not finished in time to be used in the Acorn Archimedes range of computers, which shipped in 1987 with an operating system named Arthur, later renamed RISC OS.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

JX

JX

Web site: www4.cs.fau.de/Projects/JX/index.html
Origin: Germany
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GUI
Architecture: x86
Based on: unknown
Wikipedia: JX_(operating_system)
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 0.1.1 | October 10, 2007

JX – a Java operating system that focuses on a flexible and robust operating system architecture.

The JX system architecture consists of a set of Java components executing on the JX core that is responsible for system initialization, CPU context switching and low-level domain management. The Java code is organized in components which are loaded into domains, verified, and translated to native code.

Main-stream operating systems and traditional microkernels base their protection mechanisms on MMU-provided address space separation. Protection in JX is solely based on the type safety of the intermediate code, the Java bytecode.

The system runs either on off-the-shelf PC hardware (i486, Pentium, and embedded PCs, such as the DIMM-PC) or as a guest system on Linux. Many of the JX Java components, for example the file system, also run on an unmodified JVM. When running on the bare hardware, the system can access IDE disks , 3COM 3C905 NICs, and Matrox G200 video cards. The network code contains IP, TCP, UDP, NFS2 client and server, SUN RPC. Applications that run on top of JX include an Ext2 file system, a window manager, and a database system.

The JX system is developed as an open source system by the University of Erlangen (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, FAU), a public research university in the cities of Erlangen and Nuremberg in Bavaria, Germany.

Download

JX 0.1.1 source 2.8MB.tgz
md5sum: e728a1f8e1c48066d92450493ba045ef

JX 0.1.1 demo 1.4MB.floppy
md5sum: 1c2910b5779ae17330378df63276624c

VeraCrypt RescueDisk

VeraCrypt RescueDisk

Web site: veracrypt.fr
Origin: France
Category: Rescue, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: unknown
Wikipedia:
Media: Live CD
The last version | Released: 1.13 | ~2015

VeraCrypt RescueDisk – a live CD disk which features the VeraCrypt encryption software and lets you boot your computer to repair it.

VeraCrypt is a free open source disk encryption with strong security software for the Paranoid brought to you by IDRIX and based on TrueCrypt 7.1a. It adds enhanced security to the algorithms used for system and partitions encryption making it immune to new developments in brute-force attacks. It also solves many vulnerabilities and security issues found in TrueCrypt.

VeraCrypt is free open-source disk encryption software for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. In case an attacker forces you to reveal the password, VeraCrypt provides plausible deniability. In contrast to file encryption, data encryption performed by VeraCrypt is real-time (on-the-fly), automatic, transparent, needs very little memory, and does not involve temporary unencrypted files.

During the process of preparing the encryption of a system partition/drive, VeraCrypt requires that you create a so-called VeraCrypt Rescue Disk (USB disk in EFI boot mode, CD/DVD in MBR legacy boot mode).

If the VeraCrypt Boot Loader screen does not appear after you start your computer (or if Windows does not boot), the VeraCrypt Boot Loader may be damaged. The VeraCrypt Rescue Disk allows you restore it and thus to regain access to your encrypted system and data (however, note that you will still have to enter the correct password then). For EFI boot mode, select Restore VeraCrypt loader binaries to system disk in the Rescue Disk screen. For MBR legacy boot mode, select instead Repair Options.

Download

VeraCrypt RescueDisk 1.13 i386 1.8MB.iso
md5sum: 5f0b97c1c62e06dbc18cf7fdec203810

SavaJe

null

Web site: savaje.com (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Others, Mobile
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: JavaFX
Based on: unknown
Wikipedia: JavaFX
Media: install
The last version | Released: 2006

SavaJe – the SavaJe Mobile Platform, an open standards-based, Java™ platform for mobile phones, enables operators and handset manufacturers to rapidly brand and customize mobile handsets, while simultaneously delivering high performance and an advanced feature set.

The SavaJe OS was a monolithic OS-and-Java platform, an implementation of Sun Microsystems Java Standard Edition, as opposed to the more limited Micro Edition usually offered on mobile phones.

In 2007 Sun Microsystems acquires Assets from SavaJe Technologies.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

JavaOS

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86, ARM, PowerPC, SPARC
Based on: Chorus
Wikipedia: JavaOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1999

JavaOS – a closed source, based on a Java virtual machine, and written in Java operating system developed by Sun Microsystems. JavaOS is a highly compact operating system designed to run Java applications directly on microprocessors in anything from net computers to pagers.

JavaOS brings the design advantages of the Java™ programming language to an operating system. As perhaps the smallest and fastest OS that runs Java, JavaOS enables Java on a broad range of devices. JavaOS will run equally well on a network computer, a PDA, a printer, a game machine, cellular telephone, or countless other devices that require a very compact OS and the ability to run Java.

In addition, JavaOS has been built to be fully ROMable for embedded applications, and can run with as little as 512K ROM and 256K RAM. For network computers, an entire system with JavaOS, the HotJava™ Browser and space for downloading Web content and applets requires only 3MB ROM and 4MB RAM. JavaOS can be this small because it is almost completely written in Java.

JavaSoft, headquartered in Cupertino, CA, is an operating company of Sun Microsystems Inc. The company’s mission is to develop, market and support the Java technology and products based on it. Java supports networked applications and enables developers to write applications once that will run on any machine. JavaSoft develops applications, tools and systems platforms to further enhance Java as the programming standard for complex networks such as the Internet and corporate intranets.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

ChorusOS

null

Web site: docs.oracle.com/cd/E19048-01/chorus5/index.html
Origin: USA
Category: workstation, embedded
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86, Motorolla 68000, PowerPC, SPARC, ARM, MIPS
Based on: Mach kernel
Wikipedia: ChorusOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 5.1 | 2011

ChorusOS – a highly scalable and reliable embedded operating system that has established itself among top telecommunications suppliers. The ChorusOS operating system is used in public switches and PBXs, as well as within access networks, cross-connect switches, voice-mail systems, cellular base stations, web-phones, and cellular telephones.

The Sun Embedded Workshop software provides a development environment with the necessary tools to build and deploy the ChorusOS operating system on a telecommunications platform. The ChorusOS operating system is the embedded foundation for Sun’s Service-Driven Network. Offering high service availability, complete hardware and software integration, management capabilities and JavaTM technology support dedicated to telecom needs, the ChorusOS operating system allows the dynamic and cost-efficient deployment of new features and applications while maintaining the reliability and functionality of existing networks.

The ChorusOS operating system supports third-party protocol stacks, legacy applications, and applications based on real-time and Java technology, on a single hardware platform.

The ChorusOS operating system can be tuned very finely to meet the requirements of a given application or environment. The core executive component is always present in an instance of the ChorusOS operating system. Optional features are implemented as components that can be added to, or removed from, an instance of the ChorusOS operating system.

Each API function in the ChorusOS operating system is contained in one or more of the configurable components. As long as at least one of these components is configured into a given instance of the operating system, the function is available. Some library functions are independent of any specific component and are always available.

ChorusOS 5.0 runs over Solaris operating environments, and supports the following targets:
– UltraSPARC II (CP1500 and CP20x0)
– Intel x86, Pentium
– Motorola PowerPC 750 and 74×0 processor family (mpc7xx)
– Motorola PowerQUICC I (mpc8xx) and PowerQUICC II (mpc8260) microcontrollers

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

HeliOS

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: United Kingdom
Category: workstation
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Transputer
Based on: UNIX-like
Wikipedia: HeliOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.3.1

HeliOS – an open-source, Unix-like operating system for parallel computers developed by Perihelion Software. Helios was developed by the (now defunct) company called Perihelion Ltd., mainly targeting the INMOS Transputer but later adding other CPUs like the ARM series or TMS320c4x DSPs when INMOS’ decline became clear.

Perihelion Software Limited was a United Kingdom company founded in 1986 by Dr. Tim King along with a number of colleagues who had all worked together at MetaComCo on AmigaOS and written compilers for both the Amiga and the Atari ST.

The HeliOS primary architecture is the Transputer. The transputer is a series of pioneering microprocessors from the 1980s, featuring integrated memory and serial communication links, intended for parallel computing.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

Domain/OS

Apollo Computer

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: wgmr
Platform: Apollo
Based on: UNIX-like
Wikipedia: Domain/OS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: R10.4.1.2 | March 1992

Domain/OS – an Unix-like and Multics*-like the Apollo/DOMAIN operating system produced by Apollo Computer, Inc. (founded in 1980 in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, by William Poduska) from 1980 until 1989, when it was purchased by Hewlett-Packard. It was originally launched in 1981 as AEGIS, and was rebranded to Domain/OS in 1988.

The first Apollo/DOMAIN systems were the DN100s, of which 2 were shipped on March 27, 1981 with Aegis SR1 installed on them to Harvard University (information provided by Jim Ward). Documentation for Aegis SR1 consisted of 3 books written by Penny Orwick. The DN100s were discarded by Harvard University a few years ago (Harvard CS Help Desk).

The latest OS that is available for Apollo’s is Domain/OS SR10.4.1.2 (SAU7) and SR10.4.1.1 (all other SAUs), consisting of 5 tapes for SR10.4 and 3 tapes for the SR10.4.1 upgrade. Hewlett-Packard offers some patches for Apollo/DOMAIN machines (You are now required to register (free) to retrieve any patches) (Domain/OS SR10.3.5 and SR10.4/SR10.4.1). Those patches bring the OS up to SR10.4.1.2. All the SAUs from SAU1 thru SAU6 (all three-digit machines except the new HP/Apollo 4xx Series) were dropped at SR10.4 and thus can’t run Domain/OS SR10.4 operating system. SAU1 (DN100, DN400, DN420, DN600) was dropped at about SR9.7.5 or SR9.7, thus making SAU1 systems (DN100, DN400, DN420, DN600) the only ones that can’t run any of the SR10 systems.

The DN10000 machines run a different OS release, with a .p suffix, which stands for PRISM, the name of the DN10000 CPU’s architecture (Parallel Reduced Instruction Set Machine), e.g. SR10.4.p. The latest OS for DN10000’s is SR10.4.1.2.p, consisting of the 5 basic install tapes for SR10.4.p, one upgrade tape for SR10.4.1.p and HP’s patches.

Apollo was one of the first vendors of graphical workstations in the 1980s, featuring a display manager which was integrated with the operating system’s own window manager known as wmgr.

*Multics (“Multiplexed Information and Computing Service”) is an influential early time-sharing operating system based on the concept of a single-level memory.

Download
No download is available.
md5sum:

Sprite

null

Web site: ftp.cs.berkeley.edu/ucb/sprite/sprite.html
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: DECstation, SPARCstation 2
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: Sprite
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1992

Sprite – a research operating system developed at the University of California, Berkeley, by John Ousterhout’s research group.

Sprite is a distributed operating system that provides a single system image to a cluster of workstations. It provides very high file system performance through client and server caching. It has process migration to take advantage of idle machines. It was used as a testbed for research in log-structured file systems, striped file systems, crash recovery, and RAID file systems, among other things.

The Sprite project has now ended, although Sprite is still running on a few machines. If you have a DECstation 5000/200 or a SparcStation 2, you could try running Sprite off the Sprite CD-ROM.

The one single archive contains following files:
– bench.tar.Z: Sources for a collection of small benchmarks used in the paper “Why Aren’t Operating Systems Getting Faster as Fast as Hardware”.
– gdb.tar.Z: gdb for Mach 3.0. (missing)
– gld.tar.Z: Gnu linker with modifications for cross-linking between different machine types.
– hash.tar.Z: The Sprite hashing package. You’ll also need the list package.
– list.tar.Z: The Sprite list package.
– mab.tar.Z: Sources for Modified Andrew Benchmark (used in paper “Why Aren’t Operating Systems Getting Faster as Fast as Hardware” and for other purposes).
– mipsim.tar.Z: A simulator and assembly-language program debugger for the MIPS R2000 architecture, written by John Ousterhout for use in a freshman-level course in C and assembler.
– tcl: A subdirectory full of various files containing sources and documentation for Tcl and Tk and related packages. See the README file in that directory for more information.
– xtsim.tar.Z: library to interface event driven simulator to Xt toolkit.
– sprite-1.096.tar.Z: Sprite kernel sources, version 1.096. Won’t compile into a kernel, but useful for browsing or borrowing code.
– sprited.tar.Z: Sources for a Mach-based Sprite single-server. Mostly of interest only to people doing work with Mach.
– cdrom.txt: Information about Sprite sources and docs on CDROM.

Download

Sprite archive files 8MB.zip
md5sum: 6f67131f55f5069026f1e70b429983c3

9atom

null

Web site: quanstro.net/plan9/9atom/
Origin: unknown
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: Plan9
Wikipedia:
Media:
The last version | Released: April 30, 2013

9atom – an operating system based on Plan 9. 9atom (amd64 usb image, 386 iso) augments the Plan 9 distribution with the addition of a 386 PAE kernel, an amd64 cpu and terminal kernel, nupas, extra pc hardware support, IL and Ken’s fs.

“Tt is not polished, but it should contain the basics, be go compatible, contain a copy of nix, be self-compiling, and a few other things that I’ll announce once I have a bit more confidence that I haven’t jobbed the cd.”

The project founder is Erik Quanstrom.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum: