Symobi

Symobi

Web site: symobi.com
Origin: Germany
Category: Embedded, Mobile, Others
Desktop environment: GUI
Architecture: x86, PowerPC
Based on: µnOS
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.2 | October 22, 2006

Symobi (“System for mobile applications”) – a modern and mobile OS. It is based on the µnOS operating system which incorporates the Sphere microkernel. Symobi offers a complete graphical OS environment with services, a graphical user interface, standard programs, and drivers. The operating system is designed for the use in embedded and mobile systems, but is also suitable for other purposes.

Symobi is platform independent by architecture. Hence, it can be deployed on all modern processor architectures. Nevertheless, there is some work to do to really port Symobi to a new hardware platform. But this work is easy to do since only platform specific mechanisms (e.g. MMU) have to be implemented. There are no architectural changes to be made and there is no higher level programming work to do. As a result, Symobi can be ported to a new platform within weeks and to another processor model of an already supported platform within days. This basic ability of Symobi is liked a lot by our customers since it allows them to choose the hardware they really want and need for their application instead of having to choose a hardware fitting the RTOS used.

Valuable Abilities:
– real-time
– small size/footprint
– high provable stability/reliability
– simplicity
– high performance
– small, efficient API
– embeddable

Modern Features:
– multi-core/multi-processor support
– multi-platform
– client/server architecture
– isolated hardware driver architecture
– light-weight multithreading & multitasking
– strongly protected process spaces
– wide-range scalability

Supported Hardware:
– x386 / IA32
– ARM / XScale
– PowerPC

Download

Symobi 1.2 Wave Live Demo i386 9.88MB.iso.zip
md5sum: f8e3aa7d8a6d38eb3240942a90d7b46c

Symobi 1.2 PowerPC Live Demo 5.29MB.iso.zip
md5sum: 0c426f9d8bfd3fe9eabc532c4b92edf3

Symobi 1.2 VMware Image Live Demo 1.3KB.vmx.zip
md5sum: 35d9e6fb9acaa136b92c4a58b5ab963f

 

ClassiOS

null

Web site: trumpet.com.au/index.php/products/classios.html
Origin:
Category: Desktop, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia:
Media: Install CD
The last version | Released: Alpha2 | March 25, 2008

ClassiOS – an object Pascal operating system. This operating system is built entirely with the Delphi Compiler – even the boot loader. This was achieved by replacing the System.dcu and related units by a custom unit which can run in Ring 0 of the x86 CPU.

Tattam Software is redeveloping the PetrOS® IA32 (x86) OS project.

Download

ClassiOS Alpha1 i386 170KB.iso.zip
md5sum: bc54fb4d1cb2618c3b93dd31df1c9b2b
ClassiOS alpha2 i386 199KB.iso.zip
md5sum: b47f07f5ea9a7265d6fc671c940102f9

 

PetrOS

PetrOS

Web site: trumpet.com.au/index.php/products/petrosr.html
Origin:
Category: Desktop, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.01 | 2001

PetrOS – a 32-bit operating system for the PC platform, by Trumpet Software International Pty Ltd. It a small, modular, easy to use, and not resource hungry.

PETROS(r) has been created from first principles, allowing it to focus on a small size and a modular approach. It is not intended to create yet another set of instructions and syntax, rather the underlying design concept has been to create a more efficient way of performing similar tasks without the overheads of resource hungry facilities or excessive feature creep.

Some of the primary features of PETROS(r) include:
– A micro kernel of about 100K, allowing much more memory for applications.
– A full working TCP system can be acheived in approximately 200K.
– It is fast loading, fast and easy to run.
– It runs on a 486 and above level of processor.
– It has a minimum memory requirement of 2MB.
– Standard peripherals are built in.
– It is fully multi-tasking.
– It has loadable driver modules.
– It has virtual paged memory.
– It will allow continued use of superceded machine configurations.
– It contains industry standard disk stuctures and executable formats.

Possible Uses:
– POP mail server.
– SMTP mail server.
– Firesock gateway machine.

Installation Instructions:
PETROS(r) is a fully functional operating system, which replaces the functions of MS-DOS or Windows(tm). As such, it will need to install important files on your disk drives that can prevent other operating systems on the same drive from working. You should make adequate backups and emergency recovery disks before attempting to install PETROS(r) to a hard drive that is used by other operating systems.

1. Installing PETROS(r) to run from the DOS prompt.

In order to coexist with other operating systems, PETROS(r) can be started from MS-DOS (native DOS, not a DOS box). If you are in Windows 9x, restart your computer MS-DOS mode. Create a directory (usually “petros”) to save the PETROS(r) files in and use the -noboot option:

C:\>md petros
C:\>cd petros
C:\petros>a:demo.exe -noboot

Once installed, start PETROS(r) from the DOS prompt by typing “pm”:

C:\>pm

PETROS(r) will start up and locate the drives and current directory.

2. Installing on a Floppy Disk.

To install PETROS(r) on a floppy disk, first insert a blank formatted disk in the drive. Copy the file “demo.exe” to a temporary directory on your hard drive and then type “demo.exe a: -boot”:

C:\temp>copy a:demo.exe
1 file(s) copied.
C:\temp>demo a: -boot

After the installation has completed successfully, leave the disk in the drive and reboot the system. PETROS(r) will now boot and you will be able to operate from the floppy drive.

3. Installing to a hard drive.

IMPORTANT – The PETROS(r) installer will overwrite any DOS or Windows boot sector with a PETROS(r) boot sector. Make sure you prepare a recovery disk to reinstate the DOS or Windows boot sector. SHOULD THE INSTALL PROCESS FAIL OR FOR SOME REASON PETROS(r) WILL NOT BOOT, YOUR DRIVE MAY BE LEFT INOPERABLE.

NOTE: If you require a multi-boot system we suggest that you install PETROS(r) on a fresh MS-DOS drive partition prepared using fdisk. Only primary partitions can be made bootable. Fdisk can be used to select between different bootable partitions. Programs like Partition Magic can assist in setting up your partitions to be used as a multiple boot system.

To install PETROS(r) to the hard drive, run the install program from the floppy drive:

C:\>a:
A:\>demo c: -boot

Fdisk can now be used to make sure the PETROS(r) drive is the active partition to run PETROS(r) remove the floppy from the drive and reboot your machine.

Download

PetrOS Demo 1.01 i386 524KB.zip
md5sum: 7b26d23ffbc0d235659b72b5c57121b8

 

ForthOS

ForthOS

Web site: sources.vsta.org/forthos/
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: VSTa
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released:

ForthOS – a complete, standalone operating system for the PC. It includes command line, compiler, debugger, editor, and filesystem. You can give it a test drive by booting the standalone CD (image provided so you can burn your own). If you like it, you can install it onto a disk partition and boot directly from your hard disk.

ForthOS was the basis for the author’s own experimental software work; unlike many other Forth systems, this one as a real tool in day-to-day use as a part of a larger development. It is a fully standalone system, with a metacompiler used to generate new versions of ForthOS while running under ForthOS.

Download

ForthOS v1 448KB.iso.gz
md5sum: a222bb82a80b97a43ee1b324b95d2d34

ForthOS v2 virtual image disk 717KB.img.gz
md5sum: e19198440177084d85353e19e1c01f13

 

FMI/OS

null

Web site: fmios.org | fmios.ocgnet.org (not active)
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: VSTa
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released:

FMI/OS (Flexible Microkernel Infrastructure/Operating System) – a copylefted operating system based on the VSTa operating system originally written by Andrew Valencia.

It shares most of the concepts with VSTa but has some new additions such as ELF support, POSIX environment, POSIX error numbers, and the ability to compile with the latest versions of GCC.

The project developer is Erik Dalén.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

VSTa

null

Web site: vsta.org
Origin:
Category: UNIX-like, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Intel 80386, Motorola 68030
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: VSTa
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.6.8 | October 5, 2004

VSTa (Valencia Simple Tasker) – a copylefted operating system, originally written by Andrew Valencia, which uses ideas from several research operating systems in its implementation. It attempts to be POSIXish except where POSIX gets in the way, and runs on a number of different PC configurations. VSTa is also designed to take advantage of SMP right out of the box.

VSTa is an experimental kernel which attempts to blend the design of a microkernel with the system organization of Plan 9. The result is a small privileged kernel running user-mode tasks to provide system services such as device drivers, filesystems, and name registry. Like Plan 9, each service provides a filesystem-like interface.

While VSTa is not a real-time operating system in itself, numerous features associated with real-time systems offer themselves naturally to solve microkernel design issues. Process memory locking is necessary in order to allow a disk driver task to run as a user process (as otherwise, of course, you will deadlock when your disk driver tries to demand page in a piece of itself from swap.) Non-degrading priorities are necessary to permit critical system services to respond to many users without being penalized for their apparent heavy CPU use. Low-latency process dispatch is necessary to allow interrupt service code to run in a deterministic amount of time after a device event–especially important in the case of heavy data sources like dumb serial ports and LAN interfaces.

VSTa was designed with memory locking and real-time priorities. Except when a spinlock is held, a thread is preemptable even when running in kernel mode. Most spin-locks do not involve interrupt-driven code; for these, interrupts are still accepted and queued even while the spinlock is held–preemption to a real-time process is delayed until the spinlock is released.

VSTa Capabilities are the way by which VSTa defines it’s analagous to POSIX object security. It is a very general system, with a simple design, and high flexibility. A look at how the POSIX system maps into VSTa Capabilities will make it’s operational syntax clear.

The project developer is Andy Valencia.

Download

VSTa 1.6.8 binary files 31.8MB.zip
md5sum: 4ff745bfb92639164dc9cf5b5e1d60a9
VSTa 1.6.8 Boshs/QEMU virtul disk 112MB.img.gz
md5sum: d12652e29b59501e18c85eecf9b62f75
VSTa 1.6.8 source files
md5sum:

 

ExOS

null

Web site: pdos.csail.mit.edu/archive/exo/
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Exokernel
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 06.22.2000 | June 22, 2000

ExOS – an operating system kernel developed by the MIT Parallel and Distributed Operating Systems group, and also a class of similar operating systems.

An exokernel eliminates the notion that an operating system should provide abstractions on which applications are built. Instead, it concentrates solely on securely multiplexing the raw hardware: from basic hardware primitives, application-level libraries and servers can directly implement traditional operating system abstractions, specialized for appropriateness and speed.

The newest exokernel is XOK, which runs on PC hardware, and ExOS, our first library operating system (libos). The ExOS library provides a user-level and extensible implementation of an UNIX operating system. Most UNIX applications like gcc, perl, apache, tcsh, and telnet compile and work without changes using ExOS. Further, measurements of application performance show that ExOS performs at least as well as OpenBSD and FreeBSD and much better when using specialized libos’s. For example, the Cheetah web server built on top of XOK performs eight times faster than NCSA or Harvest and three to four times faster than IIS running on Windows NT Enterprise Edition.

The current exopc distribution contains the entire source tree for the XOK kernel, ExOS library operating system, and assorted user-level programs and tools for building the system. OpenBSD or Linux with libc6 is required to build the system and only certain disk and ethernet controllers are supported. It was written by a variety of people over the past four years under DARPA sponsorship. Currently, the system is still under active development by PDOS at MIT, Greg Ganger’s group at CMU, and Exotec.

Exopc is stable enough to do libos and application development but there are still many bugs and features that have not yet been implemented. Do not expect to compile everything and replace your current system with XOK/ExOS. However, things are progressing rapidly and hopefully with making the sources public the ‘net world at large can help speed development. Any additions or bug fixes are greatly welcomed and will be considered for incorporation into the main source tree.

Copyright (C) 1997 Massachusetts Institute of Technology; some code in this distribution is covered by the GNU General Public License; some files include the following copyright: Copyright (C) 1998 Exotec, Inc. (free).

Primary authors (alphabetical order):
– Hector Briceno
– Dawson Engler
– Greg Ganger
– Rusty Hunt
– John Jannotti
– Frans Kaashoek
– David Mazieres
– Tom Pinckney

Other authors (alphabetical order):
– Josh Cates
– George Candea
– Robert Grimm
– Eric Nygren
– Costa Sapuntzakis
– Yonah Schneidler
– Josh Stults
– Debby Wallach
– Doug Wyatt

Download

exopc 06.22.2000 source 53MB.tar.gz
md5sum: d1c2d45ec4204e61f84b0c8fe783f134

 

eComStation

eComStation

Web site: ecomstation.com
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GUI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OS/2
Wikipedia: eComStation
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.2 beta 2 | December 13, 2013

eComStation (eCS) – an Internet enabled platform for business desktop computing. The focus of eCS is to provide an organization with a set of world class business applications and an application engine which can support multiple API sets. eCS is REXX enabled and comes with support for Java, Windows 3.x (limited 32 bit Windows), OS/2 and DOS applications.

The eComStation was released by Serenity Systems and Mensys BV, but it is currently owned and developed by XEU.com.

Download

eComStation Demo EN_US 107MB.iso
md5sum: 4ed608b224261707f8dd4b9779caa952

 

OS/2

OS/2

Web site: www-01.ibm.com/software/os/warp-withdrawal/ (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Workplace Shell (WPS)
Architecture: x86, PowerPC
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: OS/2
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.52 | December 2001

OS/2 – a proprietary operating system, started in 1985 by IBM and Microsoft with a name of “CP/DOS”. Originally, OS/2 was expected to gradually replace DOS and Windows.

In the summer of 1990, Microsoft announced Windows 3.0 and it became a monster hit. The relationship between IBM and Microsoft was already strained, and further development of OS/2 was left entirely to IBM. Microsoft went on to develop NT, enhance Windows, and produce Windows 95.

Eventually, IBM figured out what was wrong and fixed it. OS/2 2.0 and 2.1 used 386 memory management, ran almost all DOS programs, and ran most Windows applications as well. IBM now supports clone computers, and has largely abandoned its PS/2 Microchannel family for the same PCI, ISA, IDE, SVGA architecture everyone else uses.

In the fall of 1994, IBM released Warp (OS/2 3.0) and made its last big marketing push for OS/2. IBM had a product out ten months before Windows 95 would be released. OS/2 was technically a better system than Windows 95 would be, with real program integrity, priorities, and server-quality I/O. None of this was discussed in any of the IBM ads or announcements. Instead, IBM concentrated on a “one button connection to the Internet” through IBM’s expensive public network. It would be six months before IBM released a version of Warp for corporate and campus use (with LAN support) and IBM never succeeded in capturing market share for Warp among home computer users.

Application programs could not interfere with themselves or with each other. The system could natively use larger amounts of memory. Yet the system maintained the command language and file structure of DOS.

Each OS/2 program runs in its own address space. It is common to talk about the old 16-bit programs and the newer 32-bit programs, but OS/2 does not separate the two or treat them differently. More accurately, OS/2 assumes that each of its applications may have a mixture of 16-bit and 32-bit pieces. OS/2 is itself a hybrid system with mixtures of both types of code.

OS/2 recognizes when a program has been constructed using the old 16-bit tools (producing variable sized segments) or with the new 32-bit tools (providing 4K pages). The different EXE file structure changes the way that the program is loaded into memory. Once they start running, however, all modules get the same services and all are assumed to have both 16 and 32-bit components.

Native OS/2 programs open files, request storage, or load programs by calling standard system routines. These routines are packaged in the same sort of Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLs) that are used in Windows. There are 16-bit and 32-bit libraries with versions of all the standard system services, and a program can choose which to call.

The Workplace Shell (WPS) was introduced in OS/2 2.0. WPS is an object-oriented shell allowing the user to perform traditional computing tasks such as accessing files, printers, launching legacy programs, and advanced object oriented tasks using built-in and third-party application objects that extended the shell in an integrated fashion not available on any other mainstream operating system.

The last version of OS/2 4.52 was released in 2001.

The project was re-branded to ArcaOS and is under development by Arca Noae.

Download

OS/2 3.0 Warp i386 383MB.iso
md5sum: 290f78744f5343e3bf05a331a8e0e45f
OS/2 4 Warp trial 333MB.iso
md5sum: debd1d8e3ab5e9a940e4458b9a5d6955
OS/2 4 Warp interactive demo for Win31/Win95 84MB.iso
md5sum: 95cbf702a31541e7ad20bc5e2d32bcb4