United Linux

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Web site: unitedlinux.com (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: openSUSE
Wikipedia: United Linux
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1.0 | November 19, 2002

United Linux – a consortium of Linux distributors which created a common base distribution for enterprise use. The founding members of United Linux were SUSE, Turbolinux, Conectiva and Caldera International.

United Linux 1.0 is a business-oriented system that is stable, scalable and reliable, with a quality that is as good as expensive commercial operating systems. UL 1.0 was initially available in English, Japanese, Simplified Chinese (PRC), Korean, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, German, Hungarian and French. Manufacturers of this distribution list among the greatest advantages: compliance with standards, scalability, wide availability, security. The hardware platforms include: Intel (32 and 64-bit), AMD, PowerPC (IBM eServer iSeries and pSeries) and IBM eServer zSeries. United Linux is capable of supporting up to 64 gigabytes of RAM.

The official “release party” of the 1.0 was made at Comdex, and the sponsors of the ceremony were IBM and Hewlett-Packard.

The project ended on January 22, 2004.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

ExOS

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Web site: pdos.csail.mit.edu/archive/exo/
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Exokernel
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 06.22.2000 | June 22, 2000

ExOS – an operating system kernel developed by the MIT Parallel and Distributed Operating Systems group, and also a class of similar operating systems.

An exokernel eliminates the notion that an operating system should provide abstractions on which applications are built. Instead, it concentrates solely on securely multiplexing the raw hardware: from basic hardware primitives, application-level libraries and servers can directly implement traditional operating system abstractions, specialized for appropriateness and speed.

The newest exokernel is XOK, which runs on PC hardware, and ExOS, our first library operating system (libos). The ExOS library provides a user-level and extensible implementation of an UNIX operating system. Most UNIX applications like gcc, perl, apache, tcsh, and telnet compile and work without changes using ExOS. Further, measurements of application performance show that ExOS performs at least as well as OpenBSD and FreeBSD and much better when using specialized libos’s. For example, the Cheetah web server built on top of XOK performs eight times faster than NCSA or Harvest and three to four times faster than IIS running on Windows NT Enterprise Edition.

The current exopc distribution contains the entire source tree for the XOK kernel, ExOS library operating system, and assorted user-level programs and tools for building the system. OpenBSD or Linux with libc6 is required to build the system and only certain disk and ethernet controllers are supported. It was written by a variety of people over the past four years under DARPA sponsorship. Currently, the system is still under active development by PDOS at MIT, Greg Ganger’s group at CMU, and Exotec.

Exopc is stable enough to do libos and application development but there are still many bugs and features that have not yet been implemented. Do not expect to compile everything and replace your current system with XOK/ExOS. However, things are progressing rapidly and hopefully with making the sources public the ‘net world at large can help speed development. Any additions or bug fixes are greatly welcomed and will be considered for incorporation into the main source tree.

Copyright (C) 1997 Massachusetts Institute of Technology; some code in this distribution is covered by the GNU General Public License; some files include the following copyright: Copyright (C) 1998 Exotec, Inc. (free).

Primary authors (alphabetical order):
– Hector Briceno
– Dawson Engler
– Greg Ganger
– Rusty Hunt
– John Jannotti
– Frans Kaashoek
– David Mazieres
– Tom Pinckney

Other authors (alphabetical order):
– Josh Cates
– George Candea
– Robert Grimm
– Eric Nygren
– Costa Sapuntzakis
– Yonah Schneidler
– Josh Stults
– Debby Wallach
– Doug Wyatt

Download

exopc 06.22.2000 source 53MB.tar.gz
md5sum: d1c2d45ec4204e61f84b0c8fe783f134

 

GenieOS

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Web site: genieos.toluenterprises.com (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: Debian
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 0.5 | December 18, 2005

GenieOS (previously: Debian Pure) – a single-CD Debian with GNOME and a few popular extras, such as pre-configured browser plugins and multimedia support. GenieOS helps new users install a standard Debian desktop, along with common third-party plugins that are not distributed through official Debian packages (DVD player, Flash, Sun Java, and MPlayer).

The last version of GenieOS is based on Debian “Sarge”.
There was also an additional release – a remastered edition of PCLinuxOS for the GNOME fans.

The project founder is Rober Tolu.

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Buffalo Linux

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Web site: mcalesterlinux.net (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Blackbox, Fluxbox, GNOME, IceWM, KDE, WindowMaker, Xfce
Architecture: x86
Based on: Slackware
Wikipedia (NO): Buffalo Linux
Media: Live CD
The last version | Released: 1.7.3 | May 8, 2005

Buffalo Linux – a Linux distribution, a derivative of VectorLinux and thus also Slackware, and was intended for the 32-bit architecture i686. The target group users is a small companies within the business sector. The distribution came pre-installed with IBM DB2 and Oracle Database, Microsoft products, and CodeWeavers as well. The distribution cost US $ 25.

The distribution supported the i486 platform. It used the Blackbox, Fluxbox, IceVM and WindowMaker window managers and the GNOME, KDE and Xfce desktop environments.

Version 1.05 was launched on December 28, 2003, and the latest version 1.7.5 was launched on May 8, 2005.

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TrueOS

TrueOS

Web site: trueos.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86_64
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia: TrueOS
Media: Install DVD/USB
The last version | Released: 18.12 ? | December 15, 2018
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: TrueOS

TrueOS – an open-source Unix-like, server-oriented FreeBSD based operating system. The project started as the PC-BSD project.

TrueOS was also able to run Linux software, in addition to FreeBSD Ports collection, and it had its own .txz package manager. TrueOS supported OpenZFS, and the installer offered disk encryption with geli.

The project founder is Kris Moore.
It was under active development between 2016 and 2018, and finished in 2020.

Download

TrueOS 18.03 x64 2.4GB.iso
md5sum: 1dfdf1689f3430600dfa9234b25503e9

TrueOS 18.03 x64 USB 2.6GB.img
md5sum: 3e4d6b2f8bc4c0dd004ea766dba84d51

 

Digital UNIX

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Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server, Workstation
Desktop environment: CDE
Architecture: Mach
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 5.1 (?) | 2001 (?)

Digital UNIX (previously: OSF/1 or DUNIX) – a 64-bit advanced kernel architecture based on Mach V2.5 kernel design with components from Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) 4.3 and 4.4, UNIX® System V, and other sources. Mach is a kernel developed at Carnegie Mellon University to support operating system research, primarily distributed and parallel computing.

Digital UNIX is DIGITAL Equipment Corporation’s implementation of the Open Software Foundation™ OSF/1 R1.0, R1.1, and R1.2 technology, and the Motif graphical user interface and programming environment.

It supports following file systems: Berkeley UFS, AdVFS, NFS, ISO9660, FAT, SMB, DFS.

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ULTRIX

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Web site: digital.com/info/SP2640/ (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server, Workstation
Desktop environment: X10/X11
Architecture: MIPS, VAX
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: ULTRIX
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.5 | December 1995

ULTRIX – an operating system made by DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation), based on the 4.2BSD UNIX operating system with improvements 4.3BSD and System V Release 2 Contain various improvements that are specific to the digital hardware systems.

First Ultrix-32 was based on 4.2BSD with some of the features of System V, and released in 1984.
Its purpose was to be a pure UNIX for VAX with support for DEC. Later, Ultrix-32 added support for DECnet DEC and other appropriate protocols such as LAT.

ULTRIX runs on VAX and MIPS (R2000, R3000 or R4000 series).

The file systems support:
– can read/write: UFS (RW)e36, NFS (RW)e36
– can read: ISO 9660 (R)e100
– can read/write through third party or optional software: FAT (RW)w55 [using “mtools”, a set of MS-DOS utilities for UNIX, SMB (through SAMBA)

The latest version Ultrix-11 V4.5 was released in November 1995.

The Digital Equipment Corporation was bought in 1998 by Compaq, and starting from 2002 the Compaq is a part of Hewlett-Packard.

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VAST

VAST

Web site: vipervast.sourceforge.net
Origin: USA
Category: Penetration
Desktop environment: Cinnamon
Architecture: x86
Based on: Linux Mint
Wikipedia:
Media: Live DVD
The last version | Released: 3.1 | October 29, 2012

VAST – a Linux-based security distribution specifically designed for pentesting VoIP and UC networks.

It enables security professionals and UC administrators to rapidly perform VoIP security assessments and enumerate vulnerabilities in IP Phones or IP PBX servers in a lab environment. With VAST, a security consultant has every tool necessary to carry out a successful onsite or remote penetration test or vulnerability assessment against a UC network.

VAST is built on Mint Linux 13 and includes all of the open source VIPER Lab tools, in addition to some other network pentest tools.

Live system username/password: vast

Download

VAST 3.1 i386 1.72GB.iso
md5sum: 22651c33e23a7e3a4225947937a49a0b

 

mtXinu

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Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: X11
Architecture: Mach 386
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: mtXinu
Media: Install floppy disks
The last version | Released: ? | 1991 ?

mtXinu (reverse of UNIX TM) – a software company created in 1983, which produced the two operating systems. mtXinu was commercially licensed version of the BSD UNIX operating system for the DEC VAX. VAX is a line of computers developed by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in the mid-1970s.

The initial version was based on 4.1cBSD; later versions were based on 4.2 and 4.3BSD. more / BSD was actually mtXinu version 4.3BSD-Tahoe for VAX and HP 9000, which contained the HPBSD a University of Utah.

In 1991 mtXinu changed its name to Xinet.

The compressed zip file contains binary floppy disks of mtXinu Mach386 of: bootstrap, file system, DUI, base system, on line documents, networking and X window system.

Download

mtXinu Mach386 MB920331020 floppy disks 35MB.zip
md5sum: 6b16a43a9efe7406b33d7dfa7131ea1d

 

AOS

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Web site: uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv/ibm-rt-faq.aos/msg00000.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: RISC 32bit
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media:
The last version | Released: ? | 1987 ?

AOS (Academic Operating System) was IBM’s version of UNIX 4.3BSD for the IBM RT (RISC Technology Personal Computer). Academic institutions were offered as an alternative to AIX, the usual RT operating system. It seems that there was a later version of the AOS that stemmed from 4.3BSD-Reno, but was never distributed in large numbers.

There is also the Academic Operating System from Scratch by Hirochika Asai, the last commit at GitHub was made in 2016.
His project page says:
“We are developing an operating system for my personal research and practical education. For the academic purpose, this motivation is similar to MINIX, but we do not focus on theories. Our main objective is to provide knowledges on hardware-related programming. This is one of the most difficult and complex parts when we start the development of operating system from scratch.”