VAST

VAST

Web site: vipervast.sourceforge.net
Origin: USA
Category: Penetration
Desktop environment: Cinnamon
Architecture: x86
Based on: Linux Mint
Wikipedia:
Media: Live DVD
The last version | Released: 3.1 | October 29, 2012

VAST – a Linux-based security distribution specifically designed for pentesting VoIP and UC networks.

It enables security professionals and UC administrators to rapidly perform VoIP security assessments and enumerate vulnerabilities in IP Phones or IP PBX servers in a lab environment. With VAST, a security consultant has every tool necessary to carry out a successful onsite or remote penetration test or vulnerability assessment against a UC network.

VAST is built on Mint Linux 13 and includes all of the open source VIPER Lab tools, in addition to some other network pentest tools.

Live system username/password: vast

Download

VAST 3.1 i386 1.72GB.iso
md5sum: 22651c33e23a7e3a4225947937a49a0b

 

mtXinu

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: X11
Architecture: Mach 386
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: mtXinu
Media: Install floppy disks
The last version | Released: ? | 1991 ?

mtXinu (reverse of UNIX TM) – a software company created in 1983, which produced the two operating systems. mtXinu was commercially licensed version of the BSD UNIX operating system for the DEC VAX. VAX is a line of computers developed by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in the mid-1970s.

The initial version was based on 4.1cBSD; later versions were based on 4.2 and 4.3BSD. more / BSD was actually mtXinu version 4.3BSD-Tahoe for VAX and HP 9000, which contained the HPBSD a University of Utah.

In 1991 mtXinu changed its name to Xinet.

The compressed zip file contains binary floppy disks of mtXinu Mach386 of: bootstrap, file system, DUI, base system, on line documents, networking and X window system.

Download

mtXinu Mach386 MB920331020 floppy disks 35MB.zip
md5sum: 6b16a43a9efe7406b33d7dfa7131ea1d

 

AOS

null

Web site: uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv/ibm-rt-faq.aos/msg00000.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: RISC 32bit
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media:
The last version | Released: ? | 1987 ?

AOS (Academic Operating System) was IBM’s version of UNIX 4.3BSD for the IBM RT (RISC Technology Personal Computer). Academic institutions were offered as an alternative to AIX, the usual RT operating system. It seems that there was a later version of the AOS that stemmed from 4.3BSD-Reno, but was never distributed in large numbers.

There is also the Academic Operating System from Scratch by Hirochika Asai, the last commit at GitHub was made in 2016.
His project page says:
“We are developing an operating system for my personal research and practical education. For the academic purpose, this motivation is similar to MINIX, but we do not focus on theories. Our main objective is to provide knowledges on hardware-related programming. This is one of the most difficult and complex parts when we start the development of operating system from scratch.”

 

eComStation

eComStation

Web site: ecomstation.com
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: GUI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OS/2
Wikipedia: eComStation
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.2 beta 2 | December 13, 2013

eComStation (eCS) – an Internet enabled platform for business desktop computing. The focus of eCS is to provide an organization with a set of world class business applications and an application engine which can support multiple API sets. eCS is REXX enabled and comes with support for Java, Windows 3.x (limited 32 bit Windows), OS/2 and DOS applications.

The eComStation was released by Serenity Systems and Mensys BV, but it is currently owned and developed by XEU.com.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

OS/2

OS/2

Web site: www-01.ibm.com/software/os/warp-withdrawal/ (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: Workplace Shell (WPS)
Architecture: x86, PowerPC
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: OS/2
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.52 | December 2001

OS/2 – a proprietary operating system, started in 1985 by IBM and Microsoft with a name of “CP/DOS”. Originally, OS/2 was expected to gradually replace DOS and Windows.

In the summer of 1990, Microsoft announced Windows 3.0 and it became a monster hit. The relationship between IBM and Microsoft was already strained, and further development of OS/2 was left entirely to IBM. Microsoft went on to develop NT, enhance Windows, and produce Windows 95.

Eventually, IBM figured out what was wrong and fixed it. OS/2 2.0 and 2.1 used 386 memory management, ran almost all DOS programs, and ran most Windows applications as well. IBM now supports clone computers, and has largely abandoned its PS/2 Microchannel family for the same PCI, ISA, IDE, SVGA architecture everyone else uses.

In the fall of 1994, IBM released Warp (OS/2 3.0) and made its last big marketing push for OS/2. IBM had a product out ten months before Windows 95 would be released. OS/2 was technically a better system than Windows 95 would be, with real program integrity, priorities, and server-quality I/O. None of this was discussed in any of the IBM ads or announcements. Instead, IBM concentrated on a “one button connection to the Internet” through IBM’s expensive public network. It would be six months before IBM released a version of Warp for corporate and campus use (with LAN support) and IBM never succeeded in capturing market share for Warp among home computer users.

Application programs could not interfere with themselves or with each other. The system could natively use larger amounts of memory. Yet the system maintained the command language and file structure of DOS.

Each OS/2 program runs in its own address space. It is common to talk about the old 16-bit programs and the newer 32-bit programs, but OS/2 does not separate the two or treat them differently. More accurately, OS/2 assumes that each of its applications may have a mixture of 16-bit and 32-bit pieces. OS/2 is itself a hybrid system with mixtures of both types of code.

OS/2 recognizes when a program has been constructed using the old 16-bit tools (producing variable sized segments) or with the new 32-bit tools (providing 4K pages). The different EXE file structure changes the way that the program is loaded into memory. Once they start running, however, all modules get the same services and all are assumed to have both 16 and 32-bit components.

Native OS/2 programs open files, request storage, or load programs by calling standard system routines. These routines are packaged in the same sort of Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLs) that are used in Windows. There are 16-bit and 32-bit libraries with versions of all the standard system services, and a program can choose which to call.

The Workplace Shell (WPS) was introduced in OS/2 2.0. WPS is an object-oriented shell allowing the user to perform traditional computing tasks such as accessing files, printers, launching legacy programs, and advanced object oriented tasks using built-in and third-party application objects that extended the shell in an integrated fashion not available on any other mainstream operating system.

The last version of OS/2 4.52 was released in 2001.

The project was re-branded to ArcaOS and is under development by Arca Noae.

Download

OS/2 3.0 Warp i386 383MB.iso
md5sum: 290f78744f5343e3bf05a331a8e0e45f
OS/2 4 Warp trial 333MB.iso
md5sum: debd1d8e3ab5e9a940e4458b9a5d6955
OS/2 4 Warp interactive demo for Win31/Win95 84MB.iso
md5sum: 95cbf702a31541e7ad20bc5e2d32bcb4

 

Caldera

Caldera OpenLinux

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation, Server
Desktop environment: GNOME, KDE
Architecture: x86
Based on: LST Power Linux
Wikipedia: Caldera OpenLinux
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 3.1.1 | June 1, 2002

Caldera OpenLinux – a based on LST Power Linux, a Slackware-derived distribution that had been maintained by Linux Support Team since 1993 and the first to come with a Linux 2.0 kernel. It was developed by Caldera Systems (now SCO Group) since 1998.

Caldera Systems created a full featured GUI system administration tool called Caldera Open Administration System (COAS). The tool was a unified, easy to use administration tool with a modular design. With its scalability and broad scope abilities.

Source: wikipedia.org; License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License;

Download

Caldera OpenLinux 3.1 Workstation i386 661MB.iso
md5sum: 9435023bc5fae5086dbb6505fabcd1dd
Caldera OpenLinux 3.1 Server i386 637MB.iso
md5sum: 25fee2586812ccf5bc5dd02cfef8012b

 

PC-BSD

PC-BSD

Web site: pcbsd.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: Lumina
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia: TrueOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 10.3 | April 4, 2016
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: TrueOS

PC-BSD – an open-source operating system based on FreeBSD and fully compatible with it. PC-BSD is easy to use and targeted to home and office users.

It has an easy-to-use graphical installer, the default environment is KDE, but the installer (since version 9.0) also offers GNOME, LXDE and Xfce desktops. From 2014, the project developed own, Qt based with Fluxbox window manager, desktop environment called Lumina.

PC-BSD uses the “.pbi” packages. The package manager allows you to install packages with dependencies as well.
Unlike FreeBSD and Linux, the “.pbi” packages contain all the libraries needed to run the program, so the manager installs each one separately.
The advantage of this policy is ease of installing packages, the disadvantage of their large size.

PC-BSD was offered in form of hybrid DVD/USB installation media.

In August 2016, PC-BSD changed its name to TrueOS and is a rolling release operating system.

The project founder is Kris Moore.

Download

PC-BSD 10.0 Install amd64 3.66GB.iso
md5sum: 6ba4d8ae90f943d76ed02b6de29612f9

PC-BSD 9.0 Live KDE/GNOME/XFCE/LXDE x86 2.10GB.iso
md5sum: b3a6957c2bda29d046143e20cb31454d

 

Fsaos

Fsaos

Web site: github.com/farlepet/fsaos
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent ?
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: ? | August 8, 2014

Fsaos (Fairly Simple Assembly Operating System) – an operating system created purely for hobby and education purposes.

It is mostly written in Assembly and released under the MIT License.

The project founder is Peter Farley.

Download

Fsaos x86 485KB.iso
md5sum: 20de75f18ab08497af843331245cd766
Fsaos source code 89KB.zip
md5sum: 1874dc55b57a6d1542db1205b1185d62

 

OpenStep

OpenStep

Web site: gnustep.org/resources/OpenStepSpec/OpenStepSpec.html
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment:
Architecture: IA-32, PA-RISC, SPARC
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: OpenStep
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | ?

OpenStep – an object-oriented operating system that uses any modern operating system as its core. Mainly created by NeXT. NeXT Computer Inc, and Sun Microsystems Inc. teamed up in late 1993 to push a free object layer API based on the NeXTSTEP object system. This agreement evolved into the OpenStep specification which was published by NeXT in a first draft back in summer 1994.

There is a distinction between OpenStep, which is an API specification, and OPENSTEP (capitalized) which is a specific implementation of OpenStep developed by NeXT. Although it was originally created on a Unix-based Mach kernel (just like the NeXTSTEP core), OPENSTEP versions were also available on Solaris and Microsoft Windows NT. Therefore, OPENSTEP libraries (which were supplied with the OPENSTEP system) are actually a subset of the original OpenStep specification.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

NeXTSTEP

NeXTSTEP

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment:
Architecture: Intel x86, Motorola 68000, SPARC, PA-RISC
Based on: UNIX
Wikipedia: NeXTSTEP
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.2 Pre-release 2 | September 1997

NeXTSTEP – an object-oriented, multitasking operating system created by NeXT Computer, Inc. a company founded in 1985 by Apple Computer co-founder Steve Jobs.

This system was created on the base of Mach microkernel and BSD Unix system code. NeXTStep was oriented to work in a graphical environment. It had a very well-prepared, intuitive user interface, based on object-oriented architecture, quite different from both the most popular then Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Mac OS. The visualization engine was based on Postscript, which on one hand made it very demanding in terms of hardware (considerable demand for memory) and on other hand an ideal solution for industrial and designer workstations.

NeXTSTEP 1.0 was released 18 September 1989 after a couple of hits in 1986, and last Release 3.3 in early 1995, and previously worked only on the Motorola 68000 CPU family (especially the original black boxes) and the generic IBM compatible x86/Intel, Sun SPARC , and HP PA-RISC. About the time 3.2 releases NeXT teamed up with Sun Microsystems to develop OpenStep, cross-platform implementation of the standard (for Sun Solaris, Microsoft Windows, and NeXT Mach kernel version) based on NEXTSTEP 3.2.

In February 1997, after the purchase of NeXT by Apple, it became the source of the popular operating systems macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.

The NeXTSTEP screenshot’s author: Gürkan Sengün; source: Wikipedia; License: GNU GPL.

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No download is available.
md5sum: