mtXinu

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: X11
Architecture: Mach 386
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: mtXinu
Media: Install floppy disks
The last version | Released: ? | 1991 ?

mtXinu (reverse of UNIX TM) – a software company created in 1983, which produced the two operating systems. mtXinu was commercially licensed version of the BSD UNIX operating system for the DEC VAX. VAX is a line of computers developed by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in the mid-1970s.

The initial version was based on 4.1cBSD; later versions were based on 4.2 and 4.3BSD. more / BSD was actually mtXinu version 4.3BSD-Tahoe for VAX and HP 9000, which contained the HPBSD a University of Utah.

In 1991 mtXinu changed its name to Xinet.

The compressed zip file contains binary floppy disks of mtXinu Mach386 of: bootstrap, file system, DUI, base system, on line documents, networking and X window system.

Download

mtXinu Mach386 MB920331020 floppy disks 35MB.zip
md5sum: 6b16a43a9efe7406b33d7dfa7131ea1d

 

AOS

null

Web site: uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv/ibm-rt-faq.aos/msg00000.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: RISC 32bit
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media:
The last version | Released: ? | 1987 ?

AOS (Academic Operating System) was IBM’s version of UNIX 4.3BSD for the IBM RT (RISC Technology Personal Computer). Academic institutions were offered as an alternative to AIX, the usual RT operating system. It seems that there was a later version of the AOS that stemmed from 4.3BSD-Reno, but was never distributed in large numbers.

There is also the Academic Operating System from Scratch by Hirochika Asai, the last commit at GitHub was made in 2016.
His project page says:
“We are developing an operating system for my personal research and practical education. For the academic purpose, this motivation is similar to MINIX, but we do not focus on theories. Our main objective is to provide knowledges on hardware-related programming. This is one of the most difficult and complex parts when we start the development of operating system from scratch.”

 

PC-BSD

PC-BSD

Web site: pcbsd.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop, Server
Desktop environment: Lumina
Architecture: x86, x86_64
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia: TrueOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 10.3 | April 4, 2016
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: TrueOS

PC-BSD – an open-source operating system based on FreeBSD and fully compatible with it. PC-BSD is easy to use and targeted to home and office users.

It has an easy-to-use graphical installer, the default environment is KDE, but the installer (since version 9.0) also offers GNOME, LXDE and Xfce desktops. From 2014, the project developed own, Qt based with Fluxbox window manager, desktop environment called Lumina.

PC-BSD uses the “.pbi” packages. The package manager allows you to install packages with dependencies as well.
Unlike FreeBSD and Linux, the “.pbi” packages contain all the libraries needed to run the program, so the manager installs each one separately.
The advantage of this policy is ease of installing packages, the disadvantage of their large size.

PC-BSD was offered in form of hybrid DVD/USB installation media.

In August 2016, PC-BSD changed its name to TrueOS and is a rolling release operating system.

The project founder is Kris Moore.

Download

PC-BSD 10.0 Install amd64 3.66GB.iso
md5sum: 6ba4d8ae90f943d76ed02b6de29612f9

PC-BSD 9.0 Live KDE/GNOME/XFCE/LXDE x86 2.10GB.iso
md5sum: b3a6957c2bda29d046143e20cb31454d

 

PmBSD

null

Web site: pmbsd.org (not active)
Origin: France
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | 2012

PmBSD (Pigeon Mouette BSD) – a project provides a FREE, multi-platform BSD UNIX-like operating system.

PmBSD is ‘what we think a BSD is’ and was totally written from scratch. The only sources stolen by this project were stolen from OpenBSD and are a part of this website and the file sys/queue.h.

The project founder is Sylvestre Gallon.
It was under active development between 2009 and 2012.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

FabBSD

null

Web site: fabbsd.org
Origin: Canada
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: 4.4BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | May 2018

FabBSD – a special purpose 4.4BSD-based UNIX-like operating system, designed for machine control applications. Using low-cost hardware, FabBSD can be used to control a wide array of CNC milling machines, lathes, routers, process-control and automation equipment.

A common task of FabBSD systems is the coordinated motion of machine axes, whether driven by steppers, servo-motors or cylinders (with or without software-based closed-loop control). FabBSD uses a kernel-mode trajectory planner to generate stable motion control signals (using blended S-curve velocity profiles) at high frequencies with minimal hardware requirements.

It features applications such as:
– Machine tools: CNC milling machines, lathes, routers, lasers
– Automation: Manipulators, power supplies, relays, valves, heaters
– Instrumentation: Optical encoders, thickness gauges, sensors

FabBSD’s kernel and base are forked from OpenBSD. Its machine control drivers (/sys/dev/cnc/), userland libraries (libcnc) and applications could be easily ported back to OpenBSD, NetBSD or FreeBSD with minimal patching to other parts of the kernel. The base distribution includes OpenSSH, Sudo, Binutils, GCC and GDB. The installation process is straightforward (via CD-ROM, FTP, floppies or tapes).

As of 2018, FabBSD is undergoing active development again and contributors are welcome to provide feedback or patches.

The project founder is Julien Nadeau Carriere.

 

DEMOS

DEMOS on WIndows

Web site: (not active)
Origin: Russia (Soviet Union)
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: Motorola 68020, PDP-11, CM 1700, XT Clones
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: DEMOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 3.0 ? | May 1983 ?

DEMOS / Демос (Dialogovaya Edinaya Mobilnaya Operatsionnaya Sistema / Диалоговая Единая Мобильная Операционная Система) – a Soviet version of Unix that included portions of AT&T Unix, portions from BSD, and some parts translated into Russian, and other utilities written in Russian.

The system development been started by Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in 1982, and later development was doing with cooperation of DEMOS Co-operative.

It was developed for:
– SM-4 (a PDP-11/40 clone)
– SM-1600

It was ported to:
– Elektronika-1082
– BESM
– ES EVM
– clones of VAX-11(SM-1700)
– PC/XT
– Elektronika-85 (a clone of DEC Professional)
– Motorola 68020-based microcomputers

The project been closed in 1991.

The screenshot source: gunkies.org; author: Neozeed; license: GNU Free Documentation License 1.2.

 

SunOS

null

Web site: oracle.com/us/sun/index.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: 386i, Sun, SPARC
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: SusOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.1.4 | November 1994

SunOS – a UNIX based OS derived from BSD, created by Sun Microsystems. Initially released in 1982, it was the standard OS on Sun Machines at that time. Platforms supported by this OS were the Motorola 68000, the Sun 386i, and the SPARC.

Sun-1’s were the very first models ever produced by Sun. The earliest ran Unisoft V7 UNIX; SunOS 1.x was introduced later. According to some sources, fewer than 200 Sun-1’s were ever produced; they are certainly rare. The switch from Motorola 68000’s to 68010’s occurred during the Sun-1’s reign. Some models are reported to have 3Mbit Ethernet taps as well as 10Mbit.
68000-based Sun-1’s are not supported by SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-1’s may be the same as the last version to support Sun-2’s, since the 100U CPU boards are the same part.

Sun-2’s were introduced in the early 1980’s and were Sun’s first major commercial success. While not as popular or as common as the later Sun-3’s, they did well and there are still quite a few in circulation in the home/collector-used market.
All Sun-2’s are based on the Motorola 68010 and run SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-2’s was 4.0.3. Early Sun-2’s were Multibus; later models were VME, which Sun continued to use through the Sun-3 era and well into the Sun-4 line.

Sun switched to using the Motorola 68020 with the introduction of the Sun-3’s. A few later models had 68030’s, but by that time Sun was already moving toward SPARC processors. All models either have a 68881 or 68882 FPU installed stock or at least have a socket for one. All models which are not in pizza box chassis are VMEbus. Two out of three pizza box models have a “P4” connector which can take a framebuffer; the exception is the 3/50.
Support for Sun-3’s was introduced in SunOS 3.0. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-3’s was 4.1.1U1.
During the Sun-3 era, Sun introduced the handy practice of putting the model number on the Sun badge on the front of the chassis.
There are two different kernel architectures in the Sun-3 model line. All 68020-based models are “sun3” architecture; 68030-based models (the 3/80 and 3/4xx) are “sun3x” architecture.

The Sun 386i models, based on the Intel 80386 processor, were introduced when 80386-based IBM PC/AT clones were starting to become widespread. Intel had finally produced a chip sufficiently capable (32-bit, among other things) to allow porting SunOS, and using an Intel processor and an ISA bus offered the ability to run MS-DOS applications without speed-draining emulation. Unfortunately, they were a dismal failure.
Support for Sun-386i’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0. The 386i SunOS releases came from Sun’s East Coast division, so 386i SunOS was not identical to the standard version with the same number. The last released version of SunOS to support Sun-386i’s was 4.0.2; there are a few copies of 4.0.3Beta (with OpenLook 2.0) floating around.

Support for Sun-4’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0, although there was a special variant of SunOS 3.2 for Sun-4’s which was shipped with some very early units. Since this product line is still current, it is still in general supported by SunOS, which has mutated to become part of Solaris. Support for some earlier models has been dropped, and some later models require at least 4.0.3c, 4.1.1, or Solaris 2.x.

SunOS took a shift starting with version 5.0, which changed its base from BSD to Unix System V Release 4, and became Solaris. The last release under the SunOS name was Version 4.1.4, released in November 1994.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

HPBSD

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Web site: flux.utah.edu/~mike/hpbsd/hpbsd.html
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: HP 9000
Based on: 4.3BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.0 | April 1993

HPBSD – a port of 4.3BSD UNIX operating system for the HP9000 300, 400, 700 and 800 series machines done by Systems Programming Group at the University of Utah, developed between 1987 and 1993.

The goal was to replace the HP-UX (System V derivative) with BSD environments on HP machines in Utah CS department, in order to improve compatibility with Vaxen who worked on BSD and Sun workstations that ran on SunOS. Port was completed in a month, thanks to an older BSD port for HP 9000/200. Trait that was HPBSD tell any binary compatibility with HP-UX-TV. I went to support the HP 9000 HPBSD was later inserted into the main tree BSD code, and appeared in 4.3BSD-Reno.

The current version, HPBSD 2.0, is still largely based on 4.3bsd but has the 4.4bsd filesystem and networking kernel code and utilities as well as the ANSI-compliant C library. This version was “released” in April 1993. Improvements has been limited to bug fixes and support for new hp700 CPUs that we have. It is still the desktop operating system of choice inside the Flux and Avalanche research groups.

HPBSD is based on the 4.3 release of BSD from CSRG at Berkeley with additions from 4.4bsd and numerous local modifications. It still looks and feels pretty much like a 4.3 system, but configuring and building software packages is more 4.4bsd-like.

Supported Hardware: HP300/400 (68k based) and HP700/800 (PA-RISC based).
Since HPBSD contains AT&T and HP proprietary code it is not freely available.

The project founder is Mike Hibler.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

2.11BSD

null

Web site: github.com/RetroBSD/2.11BSD
Origin: ?
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: 4.3BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.11 | November 1994

2.11BSD – a BSD operating system based on and comes with several missing pieces that came after the 4.3BSD-Tahoe. 2.11BSD CSRG was the last edition of the DEC PDP-11 line system. This release is maintained Steven Schultz with a series patchlevel. It is the release of 4.4BSD-Lite, and requires the original UNIX license.

The system hasn’t been fit onto a non-separate I&D or machine without a floating point processor in a long time. Lots of overlay schemes need to be worked out; the floating point simulator in the kernel hasn’t been tested; sendmail won’t run on a non-separate machine, so bin/mail and ucb/Mail have to auto-configure not to use sendmail; csh is overlaid now even on a separate I&D machine, /lib/cpp is pushing the limit to handle all the #define’ing that is required to compile the kernel.

Due to the amount of software ported from 4.3BSD (and the Internet) he number of PORT directories has been cut down in order to fit the distribution on two 1600bpi tapes. Many of the sources not included are available from INTERNET archive sites, others will have to be acquired from a friendly 4.3BSD site.

Credits: Cyrus Rahman, of Duke University; Steven Schultz, of Contel Federal Systems; Keith Bostic; Casey Leedom.

Download

2.11BSD-pl195 i386 27MB.tar
md5sum: fae5078f664069a383013325d290960a

 

386BSD

null

  • Web site: 386bsd.org
  • Origin: USA
  • Category: Server
  • Desktop environment: CLI
  • Architecture: x86
  • Based on: UNIX
  • Wikipedia: 386BSD
  • Media: Install
  • The last version | Released: 2.0 | August 2016

386BSD – a derived from 4.3BSD, the first open source Berkeley UNIX operating system. It was the progenitor of Linux, iOS, and Android. Beginning with “A Modest Proposal” in 1989, 386BSD broke from proprietary systems by having publicly accessible code and documentation.

386BSD Release 0.0 was distributed in 1993 in tandem to the popular “Porting Unix to the 386” article series published in Dr. Dobb’s Journal.
Release 0.1 quickly followed, enhanced with contributions throughout the globe.

386BSD Release 1.0, aka Jolix, was a break from earlier Berkeley UNIX systems through use of a modular architecture. 386BSD Release 2.0 built upon the modular framework to create self-healing components. Each release introduced novel mechanisms from role-based security to polymorphic protocols.

386BSD.org provides the opportunity to interact with the original source, articles and supporting materials, and a live demo of 386BSD Release 2.0.

386BSD is a mother of free BSD systems today, such as: BSD/386, NetBSD, FreeBSD, BSD/OS, Darwin, OpenBSD and others.

The project authors are Lynne and William Jolitz.