800 operating systems

The ArchiveOS.org service is online and active over 5 years now, and shares work of many developers of open source and/or freeware distributions/operating systems, to never forget about them.

We already reached a number of 800 operating systems of Linux, BSD, Solaris, DOS and other, independent developed, and we will be added next ones as long as possible.

Most collected operating systems is not active, but there a few still active or reactivated after a time of quiet.

Don’t forget to send a small tip to keep the project alive 🙂

Thank all of you for the last 5 years.
Aneta & Paweł

miniBSD

miniBSD

Web site: minibsd.org
Origin: Italy (?)
Category: Router
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.11 | March 3, 2005

miniBSD – a mini FreeBSD based operating system for using with CF cards, USB pens or other small media. This project is created on Manuel Kasper’s scripts. The latest version is based on FreeBSD 4.x 5.x and 6.x. This mini system can fit on 16Mb Flash. MiniBSD represents a compromise between a full FreeBSD system and a minimal system like PicoBSD.

MiniBSD consists of a series of sh scripts which support users in creating a small image containing a fully functional FreeBSD operating system. MiniBSD is designed for storage media such as smart-media or flash-cards that can be used in devices like epia, soekris or other.

Authors: Davide D’Amico, Dario Freni, Gianmarco Giovannelli

Download

miniBSD 4.11-050303 i386 6.0MB.tgz
md5sum: 272dbc0df20dadbb1dc045bf14eaea3d
miniBSD scripts 33kB.tgz
md5sum: 6a00ef9daf24e3aff052ac504a14fe6d

 

TrueOS

TrueOS

Web site: trueos.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86_64
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia: TrueOS
Media: Install DVD/USB
The last version | Released: 18.12 ? | December 15, 2018
Zobacz po polsku Zobacz po polsku: TrueOS

TrueOS – an open-source Unix-like, server-oriented FreeBSD based operating system. The project started as the PC-BSD project.

TrueOS was also able to run Linux software, in addition to FreeBSD Ports collection, and it had its own .txz package manager. TrueOS supported OpenZFS, and the installer offered disk encryption with geli.

The project founder is Kris Moore.
It was under active development between 2016 and 2018, and finished in 2020.

Download

TrueOS 18.03 x64 2.4GB.iso
md5sum: 1dfdf1689f3430600dfa9234b25503e9

TrueOS 18.03 x64 USB 2.6GB.img
md5sum: 3e4d6b2f8bc4c0dd004ea766dba84d51

 

Labyrinth BSD

null

Web site: sourceforge.net/projects/labyrinthos/
Origin:
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: | February 2003

Labyrinth BSD – a stable BSD implementation intended for the average user.

The Makefile in the source directory supports a number of targets for building components (or all) of the Labyrinth source tree, the most commonly used one being “world”, which rebuilds and installs everything in the FreeBSD system from the source tree except the kernel, the kernel-modules and the contents of /etc. The “buildkernel” and “installkernel” targets build and install the kernel and the modules (see below). Please see the top of the Makefile in this directory for more information on the standard build targets and compile-time flags.

Copyright 1997-2003 KyroSoft, Inc.

Download

Labyrinth BSD source 138MB.tar.bz2
md5sum: 788ec0abd4922a15e65188e5913b4539

 

CBSS

null

Web site: hbsd.bsdux.com.br (not active)
Origin: Brasil
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: PicoBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.1 |

CBSS – a PicoBSD based operating system, targeted to servers.

The latest version of CBSS was 2.1b which featured some tools, such as: firewall (ipfw), remote access (telnet), NAT, bandwidth control (dummynet), QoS (altq), and many others.

The CBSS project founder is Christopher Giese.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

Digital UNIX

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server, Workstation
Desktop environment: CDE
Architecture: Mach
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 5.1 (?) | 2001 (?)

Digital UNIX (previously: OSF/1 or DUNIX) – a 64-bit advanced kernel architecture based on Mach V2.5 kernel design with components from Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) 4.3 and 4.4, UNIX® System V, and other sources. Mach is a kernel developed at Carnegie Mellon University to support operating system research, primarily distributed and parallel computing.

Digital UNIX is DIGITAL Equipment Corporation’s implementation of the Open Software Foundation™ OSF/1 R1.0, R1.1, and R1.2 technology, and the Motif graphical user interface and programming environment.

It supports following file systems: Berkeley UFS, AdVFS, NFS, ISO9660, FAT, SMB, DFS.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

ULTRIX

null

Web site: digital.com/info/SP2640/ (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server, Workstation
Desktop environment: X10/X11
Architecture: MIPS, VAX
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: ULTRIX
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.5 | December 1995

ULTRIX – an operating system made by DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation), based on the 4.2BSD UNIX operating system with improvements 4.3BSD and System V Release 2 Contain various improvements that are specific to the digital hardware systems.

First Ultrix-32 was based on 4.2BSD with some of the features of System V, and released in 1984.
Its purpose was to be a pure UNIX for VAX with support for DEC. Later, Ultrix-32 added support for DECnet DEC and other appropriate protocols such as LAT.

ULTRIX runs on VAX and MIPS (R2000, R3000 or R4000 series).

The file systems support:
– can read/write: UFS (RW)e36, NFS (RW)e36
– can read: ISO 9660 (R)e100
– can read/write through third party or optional software: FAT (RW)w55 [using “mtools”, a set of MS-DOS utilities for UNIX, SMB (through SAMBA)

The latest version Ultrix-11 V4.5 was released in November 1995.

The Digital Equipment Corporation was bought in 1998 by Compaq, and starting from 2002 the Compaq is a part of Hewlett-Packard.

Download

No download is available.
md5sum:

 

mtXinu

null

Web site: (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Workstation
Desktop environment: X11
Architecture: Mach 386
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: mtXinu
Media: Install floppy disks
The last version | Released: ? | 1991 ?

mtXinu (reverse of UNIX TM) – a software company created in 1983, which produced the two operating systems. mtXinu was commercially licensed version of the BSD UNIX operating system for the DEC VAX. VAX is a line of computers developed by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in the mid-1970s.

The initial version was based on 4.1cBSD; later versions were based on 4.2 and 4.3BSD. more / BSD was actually mtXinu version 4.3BSD-Tahoe for VAX and HP 9000, which contained the HPBSD a University of Utah.

In 1991 mtXinu changed its name to Xinet.

The compressed zip file contains binary floppy disks of mtXinu Mach386 of: bootstrap, file system, DUI, base system, on line documents, networking and X window system.

Download

mtXinu Mach386 MB920331020 floppy disks 35MB.zip
md5sum: 6b16a43a9efe7406b33d7dfa7131ea1d

 

AOS

null

Web site: uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv/ibm-rt-faq.aos/msg00000.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: RISC 32bit
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia:
Media:
The last version | Released: ? | 1987 ?

AOS (Academic Operating System) was IBM’s version of UNIX 4.3BSD for the IBM RT (RISC Technology Personal Computer). Academic institutions were offered as an alternative to AIX, the usual RT operating system. It seems that there was a later version of the AOS that stemmed from 4.3BSD-Reno, but was never distributed in large numbers.

There is also the Academic Operating System from Scratch by Hirochika Asai, the last commit at GitHub was made in 2016.
His project page says:
“We are developing an operating system for my personal research and practical education. For the academic purpose, this motivation is similar to MINIX, but we do not focus on theories. Our main objective is to provide knowledges on hardware-related programming. This is one of the most difficult and complex parts when we start the development of operating system from scratch.”