SunOS

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Web site: oracle.com/us/sun/index.html (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: 386i, Sun, SPARC
Based on: BSD
Wikipedia: SusOS
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.1.4 | November 1994

SunOS – a UNIX based OS derived from BSD, created by Sun Microsystems. Initially released in 1982, it was the standard OS on Sun Machines at that time. Platforms supported by this OS were the Motorola 68000, the Sun 386i, and the SPARC.

Sun-1’s were the very first models ever produced by Sun. The earliest ran Unisoft V7 UNIX; SunOS 1.x was introduced later. According to some sources, fewer than 200 Sun-1’s were ever produced; they are certainly rare. The switch from Motorola 68000’s to 68010’s occurred during the Sun-1’s reign. Some models are reported to have 3Mbit Ethernet taps as well as 10Mbit.
68000-based Sun-1’s are not supported by SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-1’s may be the same as the last version to support Sun-2’s, since the 100U CPU boards are the same part.

Sun-2’s were introduced in the early 1980’s and were Sun’s first major commercial success. While not as popular or as common as the later Sun-3’s, they did well and there are still quite a few in circulation in the home/collector-used market.
All Sun-2’s are based on the Motorola 68010 and run SunOS. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-2’s was 4.0.3. Early Sun-2’s were Multibus; later models were VME, which Sun continued to use through the Sun-3 era and well into the Sun-4 line.

Sun switched to using the Motorola 68020 with the introduction of the Sun-3’s. A few later models had 68030’s, but by that time Sun was already moving toward SPARC processors. All models either have a 68881 or 68882 FPU installed stock or at least have a socket for one. All models which are not in pizza box chassis are VMEbus. Two out of three pizza box models have a “P4” connector which can take a framebuffer; the exception is the 3/50.
Support for Sun-3’s was introduced in SunOS 3.0. The last version of SunOS to support Sun-3’s was 4.1.1U1.
During the Sun-3 era, Sun introduced the handy practice of putting the model number on the Sun badge on the front of the chassis.
There are two different kernel architectures in the Sun-3 model line. All 68020-based models are “sun3” architecture; 68030-based models (the 3/80 and 3/4xx) are “sun3x” architecture.

The Sun 386i models, based on the Intel 80386 processor, were introduced when 80386-based IBM PC/AT clones were starting to become widespread. Intel had finally produced a chip sufficiently capable (32-bit, among other things) to allow porting SunOS, and using an Intel processor and an ISA bus offered the ability to run MS-DOS applications without speed-draining emulation. Unfortunately, they were a dismal failure.
Support for Sun-386i’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0. The 386i SunOS releases came from Sun’s East Coast division, so 386i SunOS was not identical to the standard version with the same number. The last released version of SunOS to support Sun-386i’s was 4.0.2; there are a few copies of 4.0.3Beta (with OpenLook 2.0) floating around.

Support for Sun-4’s was introduced in SunOS 4.0, although there was a special variant of SunOS 3.2 for Sun-4’s which was shipped with some very early units. Since this product line is still current, it is still in general supported by SunOS, which has mutated to become part of Solaris. Support for some earlier models has been dropped, and some later models require at least 4.0.3c, 4.1.1, or Solaris 2.x.

SunOS took a shift starting with version 5.0, which changed its base from BSD to Unix System V Release 4, and became Solaris. The last release under the SunOS name was Version 4.1.4, released in November 1994.

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HPBSD

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Web site: flux.utah.edu/~mike/hpbsd/hpbsd.html
Origin: USA
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: HP 9000
Based on: 4.3BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.0 | April 1993

HPBSD – a port of 4.3BSD UNIX operating system for the HP9000 300, 400, 700 and 800 series machines done by Systems Programming Group at the University of Utah, developed between 1987 and 1993.

The goal was to replace the HP-UX (System V derivative) with BSD environments on HP machines in Utah CS department, in order to improve compatibility with Vaxen who worked on BSD and Sun workstations that ran on SunOS. Port was completed in a month, thanks to an older BSD port for HP 9000/200. Trait that was HPBSD tell any binary compatibility with HP-UX-TV. I went to support the HP 9000 HPBSD was later inserted into the main tree BSD code, and appeared in 4.3BSD-Reno.

The current version, HPBSD 2.0, is still largely based on 4.3bsd but has the 4.4bsd filesystem and networking kernel code and utilities as well as the ANSI-compliant C library. This version was “released” in April 1993. Improvements has been limited to bug fixes and support for new hp700 CPUs that we have. It is still the desktop operating system of choice inside the Flux and Avalanche research groups.

HPBSD is based on the 4.3 release of BSD from CSRG at Berkeley with additions from 4.4bsd and numerous local modifications. It still looks and feels pretty much like a 4.3 system, but configuring and building software packages is more 4.4bsd-like.

Supported Hardware: HP300/400 (68k based) and HP700/800 (PA-RISC based).
Since HPBSD contains AT&T and HP proprietary code it is not freely available.

The project founder is Mike Hibler.

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2.11BSD

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Web site: github.com/RetroBSD/2.11BSD
Origin: ?
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: 4.3BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 2.11 | November 1994

2.11BSD – a BSD operating system based on and comes with several missing pieces that came after the 4.3BSD-Tahoe. 2.11BSD CSRG was the last edition of the DEC PDP-11 line system. This release is maintained Steven Schultz with a series patchlevel. It is the release of 4.4BSD-Lite, and requires the original UNIX license.

The system hasn’t been fit onto a non-separate I&D or machine without a floating point processor in a long time. Lots of overlay schemes need to be worked out; the floating point simulator in the kernel hasn’t been tested; sendmail won’t run on a non-separate machine, so bin/mail and ucb/Mail have to auto-configure not to use sendmail; csh is overlaid now even on a separate I&D machine, /lib/cpp is pushing the limit to handle all the #define’ing that is required to compile the kernel.

Due to the amount of software ported from 4.3BSD (and the Internet) he number of PORT directories has been cut down in order to fit the distribution on two 1600bpi tapes. Many of the sources not included are available from INTERNET archive sites, others will have to be acquired from a friendly 4.3BSD site.

Credits: Cyrus Rahman, of Duke University; Steven Schultz, of Contel Federal Systems; Keith Bostic; Casey Leedom.

Download

2.11BSD-pl195 i386 27MB.tar
md5sum: fae5078f664069a383013325d290960a

 

386BSD

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  • Web site: 386bsd.org
  • Origin: USA
  • Category: Server
  • Desktop environment: CLI
  • Architecture: x86
  • Based on: UNIX
  • Wikipedia: 386BSD
  • Media: Install
  • The last version | Released: 2.0 | August 2016

386BSD – a derived from 4.3BSD, the first open source Berkeley UNIX operating system. It was the progenitor of Linux, iOS, and Android. Beginning with “A Modest Proposal” in 1989, 386BSD broke from proprietary systems by having publicly accessible code and documentation.

386BSD Release 0.0 was distributed in 1993 in tandem to the popular “Porting Unix to the 386” article series published in Dr. Dobb’s Journal.
Release 0.1 quickly followed, enhanced with contributions throughout the globe.

386BSD Release 1.0, aka Jolix, was a break from earlier Berkeley UNIX systems through use of a modular architecture. 386BSD Release 2.0 built upon the modular framework to create self-healing components. Each release introduced novel mechanisms from role-based security to polymorphic protocols.

386BSD.org provides the opportunity to interact with the original source, articles and supporting materials, and a live demo of 386BSD Release 2.0.

386BSD is a mother of free BSD systems today, such as: BSD/386, NetBSD, FreeBSD, BSD/OS, Darwin, OpenBSD and others.

The project authors are Lynne and William Jolitz.

 

Firefly BSD

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Web site: www.fireflybsd.com (not active)
Origin: USA ?
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: DragonFly BSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 1.4 ? | September 14, 2004 ?

Firefly BSD – a commercially-supported operating system based on industry DragonFlyBSD a fork of FreeBSD. It comes with complete source and binaries for the kernel, compiler, libraries, and user utilities. In addition, thousands of contributed programs have been ported to Firefly BSD and are included in the 4-CDROM set.

A LiveCD that you can boot and run off without having to install anything on your hard drive.
A parallelized networking stack that allows for better use of multiprocessors than the serialized approach taken in FreeBSD 5.
It offers a choice of KDE 3 or Gnome 2 graphical environments on top of XFree86-4.4.0.
Ability to run Microsoft Windows network drivers to support an even wider range of network devices.

The project developer is David Rhodus.

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BSDBox

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Web site: bsdbox.sourceforge.net
Origin: China ?
Category: Firewall
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 6.0.2 | November 4, 2005

BSDBox – a basic FreeBSD box which can run on small flash rom and small memory.

It is a reduced version of FreeBSD, similar to PicoBSD but works well on flash cards (CompactFlash, USB, DOC/DOM chips).

Requirement for run time environment :
– an i386 computer, up to Pentium 4
– at lease 32M memory
– at lease 8M disk space (or a DiskOnChip 8M)

The project founder is Ru Feng.
It was under active development between 2001 and 2005.

Download

BSDBox 6.0.2 i386 34KB.tar.gz
md5sum: 95dd684f2e5343c346f2733e64c31dcf

 

CompactBSD

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Web site: compactbsd.sourceforge.net
Origin: ?
Category: Embedded
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 0.1.0 | August 22, 2002

CompactBSD – a set of tools that allow you to compress OpenBSD onto a small (32MB) compact flash card for use in small embedded servers. CompactBSD can be used to power wireless hot spots, which is what FatPort uses it for.

CompactBSD offers the easiest way to get OpenBSD up and running on Compact Flash-based systems such as the FatPointOEM. In order to use the ZComax 200mW PCMCIA wireless card in your FatPointOEM box, you will need to add a patch to the OpenBSD 3.1 kernel.

CompactBSD runs on an i386-class box running OpenBSD3.1, it also requires that Python 2.1.2 be installed.

The project developer is Ken Simpson.

Download

CompactBSD 0.1.0 i386 348KB.tgz
md5sum: 2b4457d09216c8122385d0dde15df831

 

WiBSD

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Web site: www.wibsd.cz (not active)
Origin: Czech Republic
Category: Embedded
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: FreeBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 1.0 | July 10, 2003

WiBSD – a compact FreeBSD distribution for flash card based wireless boxes.

The system is configured with only one place (/etc/rc.conf) and all other configuration files are dynamically created during system startup. Contains optional IPFW firewall that can be easily configured.

The project developers are: Jan Pechanec, David Pasek, Vaclav Petricek.

Download

WiBSD 1.0 i386 530KB.tgz
md5sum: 5a257556fc166d7a0fbd1e00bf4a917a

 

emBSD

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Web site: www.embsd.org
Origin: ?
Category: Firewall
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: 1.1 | May 2001

emBSD – a stripped down version of OpenBSD. The concept for emBSD is a small foot print operating system for x86 (or other) hardware to use as little hard disk space as possible yet provide a fully functional Routing Firewall. The main driving force behind this concept is to not use a hard disk drive at all, but use off the shelf Compact Flash cards.

emBSD is a very small system designed for specific purposes. emBSD is not currently a server base OS. It is simply made to filter, control, and forward traffic within your organization. The kernel has been optimized specifically for handling large flows of traffic as well as providing extra interfaces for migrating to IPv6. An optimal emBSD system will not have moving disks inside to potentially fail. Solid-state disks are employed on the majority of our critical machines.

The project developers are Ken Rice and Truman Boyes.

Download

emBSD 1.1 i386 16.2MB.zip
md5sum: fc75b7206ed25b07eb8447e30ee73a2f

 

CD Bootable OpenBSD firewall

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Web site: www.jtan.com/jtanoss/cdboot/
Origin: USA ?
Category: Firewall
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Live
The last version | Released: ? | May 2004 ?

CD Bootable OpenBSD firewall – the project allows you to set up a full featured OpenBSD firewall without the use of a hard disk. The system boots from a CDROM and stores configuration information on either a floppy, or a USB mass storage device, such as a “pen drive” or a USB CompactFlash reader.

The CD also contains a simple install script, to allow you populate a floppy or UMASS device with a basic firewall configuration. Simply boot the CD, select the media you wish to use, and answer some straightforward questions.

The latest version, based on OpenBSD 3.5, adds several new features. The firewall now provides PPTP VPN and a caching nameserver out of the box.

Features:
– OpenBSD 3.5 NAT Firewall using PF
– No hard disk needed
– Automated setup
– Can run with all media Read-Only
– DHCP on internal LAN
– Nameserver and Cache
– PPTP VPN

System requirements:
– x86 compatible processor
– 64M ram bare minimum (all writable filesystems are on ramdisks, and there’s no swap)
– CD-ROM drive
– floppy drive, or umass device (note the current issue with umass)
– 2 network interfaces

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