MicroBSD

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Web site: www.microbsd.net (not active)
Origin: Germany
Category: Server
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 0.7 beta | October 2003

MicroBSD – a fork of the UNIX-like BSD operating system descendant OpenBSD 3.0, begun in July 2002. The project’s objective was to produce a free and fully secure, complete system, but with a small footprint. The first phase of its development stopped in 2002. The project was later resumed by a new group of developers, which stopped development again in 2003.

Because of violations of the BSD license the MicroBSD project has been completely removed from the internet, and all MicroBSD users are asked to remove it from their computers.

The old MicroBSD project (hosted at microbsd.com) does not exist anymore, but code from it has been incorporated into the MirOS BSD project. The last version of the old MicroBSD 0.6 project was released in October 2002.

The new MicroBSD project set its goal as trying to continue what the original MicroBSD project began. A new edition of version 0.6 – with cleaned up source code and corrected copyright statements – was released in October 2003. A beta 0.7 version was being derived from OpenBSD 3.4, but the project stalled and all development ceased that November.

MicroBSD was under development by individuals from Bulgaria and was intent on a focus toward security, development of a user interface, easy management and configuration, and the addition of Bulgarian-specific localization.

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MirOS

MirOS BSD

Web site: www.mirbsd.org
Origin: Germany
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86, SPARC
Based on: OpenBSD
Wikipedia: MirOS BSD
Media: Install
The last version | Released: #10semel | March 16, 2008

MirOS BSD – a secure operating system from the BSD family for 32-bit i386 and sparc systems. It is based on 4.4BSD-Lite (mostly OpenBSD, some NetBSD®). The MirPorts Framework is a portable ports tree to facilitate the installation of additional software. The project also releases some portable software: mksh, a pdksh-based shell; PaxMirabilis, an archiver for various formats; MirMake, a framework for building software; MirNroff, an AT&T nroff based man page (and text document) formatter; MirCksum, a flexible checksumming and hash generation tool; and some more.

MirOS is available as a BSD flavour which originated as an OpenBSD patchkit, but has grown very much on its own, though still being synchronized with the ongoing development of OpenBSD, thus inheriting most of its good security history. This variant is also called “MirBSD”, but the usage of that word to denote MirOS BSD (plus MirPorts) is deprecated.

MirOS started after some differences in opinion between Theo de Raadt, the OpenBSD project leader, and Thorsten Glaser, who is now our lead developer. The main maintainer of MirPorts is BennySiegert. There are several more persons working as contributors on the project.

The latest release of MirOS is #10semel released March 16, 2008; the latest preview of MirBSD-current is 10uB4-20160117 released January 17, 2016.

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MirOS BSD 10semel i386/sparc install 9.7MB.iso
md5sum: 7ccff00227252b35a55de9b3bd682594

 

CapROS

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Web site: www.capros.org
Origin: USA
Category: Microkernel, Others
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86, ARM
Based on: EROS
Wikipedia:
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1 | May 2, 2005

CapROS (Capability-based Reliable Operating System) – an experimental capability-based operating system, based on EROS, KeyKOS, and Gnosis. Ports exist for the Intel IA-32 and ARM9 architectures. CapROS is an operating system that merges some very old ideas about capabilities with some newer ideas about performance and resource management. The result is a small, secure, real-time operating system that provides orthogonal persistence.

It is a pure capability-based system that features automatic persistence of data and processes, even across system reboots. Capability systems naturally support the principle of least authority, which improves security and fault tolerance.

The CapROS project is led by Charles Landau. It was under developed by Strawberry Development Group with funding from DARPA and others.

Download

CapROS source archive 43.7MB.tgz
md5sum: d27038d2b461eb7c772a60fb261cd0a8

 

Honeywall

Honeywall

Web site: projects.honeynet.org/honeywall/
Origin: USA
Category: Security
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: CentOS
Wikipedia:
Media: Install CD
The last version | Released: 1.4 | April 25, 2009

Honeywall CDROM – a CentoOS based bootable CD that installs onto a hard drive and comes with all the tools and functionality for you to implement data capture, control and analysis. The intent is to make Honeynets easier to deploy and customize.

You simply boot off the CDROM, configure it based on your environment, and you should have a Honeywall gateway ready to go. The CDROM supports several configuration methods, including an interactive menu and .iso customization scripts. The CDROM is an appliance, based on a minimised and secured Linux OS.

The Honeywall CDROM is a collection of various OpenSource software. If not otherwise specified, the software on the CDROM falls under the GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE.
The project was developed by a non-profit organization Honeynet.

The latest version of Honeywall 1.4 was built on the top of CentOS 5.0.

Download

Honeywall CDROM 1.4 i386 318MB.iso
md5sum: cfdb515d096cb2a99e1782b1642b3cd2

 

Coyotos

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Web site: www.coyotos.org (not active)
Origin: USA
Category: microkernel
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia (FR): Coyotos
Media: Install
The last version | Released: ? | 2010

Coyotos – a secure, microkernel-based operating system that builds on the ideas and experiences of the EROS project, that itself is the successor of KeyKOS, itself coming from GNOSIS (Great New Operating System In the Sky). Much of the code developed for EROS will migrate directly to Coyotos. The EROS system that was created at the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University.

Coyotos will be written in BitCee. BitC is a SystemProgramming language that combines the “low-level” nature of C with the semantic rigor of Scheme or ML. BitC was designed by careful selection and exclusion of language features in order to support proving properties (up to and including total correctness) of critical systems programs.

The Coyotos project has several objectives:
– Correct some of the shortcomings of the earlier EROS design.
– Demonstrate that an atomic kernel design scales up as well as down. We are planning to bring up versions of Coyotos on large-scale multiprocessors.
– Provide an efficient linux compatibility environment for use as a transitional runtime system, so that we can explore adapting applications to a more secure API foundation.
– (Eventually) Construct the kernel and key utilities in a new systems programming language (BitC) with a well-defined, mechanically-specified semantics. This will allow us to formally verify security and correctness properties of the system and its key utilities.
– Develop the proving technology necessary to do useful verification about a project of this sort.

The primary developer of EROS was Jonathan S. Shapiro, who is also a driving force behind Coyotos and the BitC programming language.
Since March 2010, the main development effort has been on the BitC language being designed for use in Coyotos: as of April 2016, the last change to Coyotos was in June 2010.

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Coherent

Coherent

Web site: www.nesssoftware.com/home/mwc/source.php
Origin: USA
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: UNIX-like
Wikipedia: Coherent_(operating_system)
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 4.2.10 | May 1994

Coherent – a clone of the UNIX operating system for Intel 286/386/486 based systems.

In 1992 COHERENT 4.0 for the 386/486 was released, and the whole system looked pretty much like the UNIX System V.3 boxes. This is meant API wise, UNIX System V.3 has many more features than COHERENT, but it is possible to get most software written for UNIX working on COHERENT. Also the system is iBCS2 compatible, so it runs the same shrinkwrap applications like the other 386 UNIX systems from SCO, Interactive and so on. The old HDB uucp was replaced with Taylor uucp from Ian Lance Taylor, which you’ll still find on almost any modern UNIX systems nowadays.

In 1994 Mark Williams released COHERENT 4.2, with STREAMS, POSIX.1 and POSIX.2 compatibility and other features, that made the system pretty much look like UNIX System V.4. Again, meant API wise, UNIX System V.4 has many more features than COHERENT.

In January 2015, Robert “Bob” Swartz (founder and president of MWC) agreed to open posting of COHERENT command and system sources under this Open Source license.

The operating system was a proprietary product, but it became open source in 2015, released under a 3-clause BSD License.
Developer of the project is Mark Williams Company (MWC), the company was closed in 1995.

License:
Copyright © 1977-1995 by Robert Swartz. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
3. Neither the name of the copyright holder nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
This software is provided by the copyright holders and contributors “as is” and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall the copyright holder or contributors be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict liability, or tort (including negligence or otherwise) arising in any way out of the use of this software, even if advised of the possibility of such damage.

Download

Coherent source 159MB.tgz
md5sum: 3d78d61f3649043558d0258fb6027692

 

Amoeba

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Web site: www.cs.vu.nl/pub/amoeba/
Origin: Netherlands
Category: Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86, MIPS, Motorola 68030, NS 32016, SUN 3/50 & 3/60, SPARC, VAX
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Amoeba_(operating_system)
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 5.3 | July 30, 1996

Amoeba – a fully functional operating system with shared time by Andrew S. Tannenbaum from Vrije University. The Amoeba distribution includes the source code, binaries and kernels for all supported architectures plus full on-line and Postscript versions of the documentation.

Amoeba is a powerful microkernel-based system that turns a collection of workstations or single-board computers into a transparent distributed system. It has been in use in academia, industry, and government for about 5 years. It runs on the SPARC (Sun4c and Sun4m), the 386/486, 68030, and Sun 3/50 and Sun 3/60.

Amoeba is a general-purpose distributed operating system. It is designed to take a collection of machines and make them act together as a single integrated system. In general, users are not aware of the number and location of the processors that run their commands, nor of the number and location of the file servers that store their files. To the casual user, an Amoeba system looks like a single old-fashioned time-sharing system.

Amoeba is an ongoing research project. It should be thought of as a platform for doing research and development in distributed and parallel systems, languages, protocols and applications. Although it provides some UNIX emulation, and has a definite UNIX-like flavor (including over 100 UNIX-like utilities), it is NOT a plug-compatible replacement for UNIX. It should be of interest to educators and researchers who want the source code of a distributed operating system to inspect and tinker with, as well as to those who need a base to run distributed and parallel applications. Amoeba is intended for both ‘‘distributed’’ computing (multiple independent users working on different projects) and ‘‘parallel’’ computing (e.g., one user using 50 CPUs to play chess in parallel). Amoeba provides the necessary mechanism for doing both distributed and parallel applications, but the policy is entirely determined by user-level programs. For example, both a traditional (i.e. sequential) ‘make’ and a new parallel ‘amake’ are supplied.

 

Softlanding Linux System

SLS

Web site: (not active)
Origin: Canada
Category: Server, Desktop
Desktop environment: CLI
Architecture: x86
Based on: Independent
Wikipedia: Softlanding Linux System
Media: Install
The last version | Released: 1993.03 ? | March 1993 ?

Softlanding Linux System (SLS) – one of the oldest Linux distributions was generally made minimal or no changes to the original software packages before including them. Distributions using this format generally provided no native software management and depended on third-party utilities for package management and administration.

The release 1.03 of SLS containing kernel 99 alpha p11, libc 4.4.1, gcc 2.4.5 and XFree86 1.3. Linux is a free 386 unix like operating system similar to System V, and developed by Linus Torvalds, plus a few hundred big hearted programmers on the Internet. SLS is produced and GPL copyrighted by Softlanding Software. You may redistribute SLS, as long as you do include both this file, and the file COPYING prominently in the distribution. You may not take credit for the work of others.

SLS is NOT just an image dump of some ones Unix system.
Instead it is a distribution whose primary purposes are:
0) provide an initial installation program (for the queasy).
1) utilities compiled to use minimal disk space.
2) provide a reasonably complete/integrated U*ix system.
3) provide a means to install and uninstall packages.
4) permit partial installations for small disk configs.
5) add a menu driven, extensible system administration.
6) take the hassle out of collecting and setting up a system.
7) give non internet users access to Linux.
8) provide a distribution that can be easily updated.

SLS contains ~600 utilities designed to provide a relatively complete computer operating system for the sophisticated user. It includes programs for compression, text processing, communications, X Windowing system, program development (Assembler, C, C++, Fortran, Pascal, Lisp, and Perl), mail, spreadsheets, and word-processing. Also supported are DOS files, a DOS emulator, SCSI, CDROMs, and TCP/IP. A 387 coprocessor is emulated by the kernel if you don’t have one. Full source code for the kernel is also provided with SLS.

The development environment includes libraries for unix and Xwindows, a debugger that does full screen (via emacs) with support for core dumps.
Shared libraries make the most miserly use of RAM and disk space. FAQ and Manual pages document most of the Linux utilities. SLS requires at least
12 Meg of disk for the minimal install. 90 Meg or more is required for the full system (not including TeX or Interviews). You will need at least 2
Meg of RAM, 4 meg if you want to compile programs, and 8 Meg to run X Windows. Note that sometimes you can get by with less, but usually with
noticeable performance limitations.

SLS was available on floppies (30 5.25 floppies or 25 3.5 floppies), QIC150 or CDROM from the address below for a flat rate distribution fee of US $99
($125 Canadian) + $15 shipping and handling. The SLS CDROM contains the full source tree and a 50+ page user manual “Using SLS”. A quarterly CD (4 CD’s over 1 year) was available for US $199 (255 Canadian) + $15 S&H.

It was founded by Peter MacDonald in May 1992. It was soon superseded by Slackware which started as a cleanup of SLS by Patrick Volkerdin.

The screenshot source: Wikipedia; author: Linuxcenter.ru; License: The copyright holder of this work allows anyone to use it for any purpose including unrestricted redistribution, commercial use, and modification.

Download

Softlanding Linux System 1.05 41.47MB.tar
md5sum: 766ec0448011668b4336c885d7be8719
Softlanding Linux System 1992.11 19.60MB.zip
md5sum: be9150cee1af2cbe1ccc5b66dea1426d
Softlanding Linux System 1993.03 28.07MB.tar.gz
md5sum: c665967993f0b2e89915f465d1be57e6